Linux Tutorials on the topic “backup”

  • Back Up Your Files With Areca On Fedora 9

    Author: o.meyerTags: , , Comments: 0

    Back Up Your Files With Areca On Fedora 9 Areca is a personal file backup software developed in Java. It allows you to select files or directories to backup, filter, encrypt and compress their content, and store them on your backup location. Areca supports incremental backups and generates backup reports, which can be stored on your disk or sent by email. This guide explains how to install and use it on a Fedora 9 desktop (GNOME).

    read more... | add comment | view as pdf | print

  • Scheduled Backups With Rsyncbackup On Debian Etch

    VMWare Image Download Author: o.meyerTags: , Comments: 1

    Scheduled Backups With Rsyncbackup On Debian Etch This document describes how to set up and configure rsyncbackup on Debian Etch. Rsyncbackup is a Perl script that cooperates with rsync. It's easy to configure and able to create scheduled backups (partial and incremental backups).

    read more... | add comment | view as pdf | print

  • MySQL Backups Using ZRM For MySQL 2.0

    Author: paddyTags: , , Comments: 0

    MySQL Backups Using ZRM For MySQL 2.0 Zmanda Recovery Manager (ZRM) for MySQL simplifies life of a database administrator who needs an easy to use yet flexible and robust backup and recovery solution for MySQL server.

    read more... | add comment | view as pdf | print

  • Creating Snapshot-Backups with BackerUpper On Ubuntu 7.10

    Author: falkoTags: , , Comments: 0

    Creating Snapshot-Backups with BackerUpper On Ubuntu 7.10 BackerUpper is a tool similar to Apple's TimeMachine. It is intended to create snapshot-backups of selected directories or even your full hard drive. From the BackerUpper project page: "Backerupper is a simple program for backing up selected directories over a local network. Its main intended purpose is backing up a user's personal data." This article shows how to install and use BackerUpper on Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon).

    read more... | add comment | view as pdf | print

  • Back Up Your Files With Fwbackups On Fedora 8

    Author: o.meyerTags: , , Comments: 0

    Back Up Your Files With Fwbackups On Fedora 8 This document describes how to set up, configure and use Fwbackups on a Fedora 8 desktop. The result is an easy-to-use backup system for desktop usage. Fwbackups creates partial backups which can be stored locally or on a removable device. You have also the option to run scheduled backups.

    read more... | add comment | view as pdf | print

  • RESTORE-EE (Enterprise Edition) User Manual

    Author: garretTags: Comments: 0

    RESTORE-EE (Enterprise Edition) User Manual This manual is part reference and part tutorial, meaning that you can look to it for everything from the simple questions of , “What does this icon do?” to the more involved questions, like “How do I schedule e-mail notifications?” Your experience with Restore will depend on your privileges on the Restore system. The administrator for the system will have a few extra capabilities that a standard user will not.

    read more... | add comment | view as pdf | print

  • Creating Snapshot-Backups with FlyBack On Ubuntu 7.10

    Author: falkoTags: , , Comments: 1

    Creating Snapshot-Backups with FlyBack On Ubuntu 7.10 FlyBack is a tool similar to Apple's TimeMachine. It is intended to create snapshot-backups of selected directories or even your full hard drive. From the FlyBack project page: "FlyBack is a snapshot-based backup tool based on rsync. It creates successive backup directories mirroring the files you wish to backup, but hard-links unchanged files to the previous backup. This prevents wasting disk space while providing you with full access to all your files without any sort of recovery program. If your machine crashes, just move your external drive to your new machine and copy the latest backup using whatever file browser you normally use." This article shows how to install and use FlyBack on Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon).

    read more... | add comment | view as pdf | print

  • RESTORE-DC (Data Center) User Manual

    Author: garretTags: Comments: 0

    RESTORE-DC User Manual This manual is part reference and part tutorial, meaning that you can look to it for everything from the simple questions of , “What does this icon do?” to the more involved questions, like “How do I schedule e-mail notifications?” Your experience with Restore will depend on your privileges on the Restore system. The administrator for the system will have a few extra capabilities that a standard user will not.

    read more... | add comment | view as pdf | print

  • Creating Snapshot Backups Of Your Desktop With Timevault On Ubuntu 7.10

    Author: o.meyerTags: , , Comments: 0

    Creating Snapshot Backups Of Your Desktop With Timevault On Ubuntu 7.10 This document describes how to set up, configure and use Timevault on Ubuntu 7.10. The resulting system provides a powerful backup system for desktop usage. TimeVault is a simple front-end for making snapshots of a set of directories. Snapshots are a copy of a directory structure or file at a certain point in time. Restore functionality is integrated into Nautilus - previous versions of a file or directory that has a snapshot can be accessed by examining the properties and selecting the 'Previous Versions' tab.

    read more... | add comment | view as pdf | print

  • Creating Encrypted FTP Backups With duplicity And ftplicity On Debian Etch

    Author: falkoTags: , Comments: 2

    Creating Encrypted FTP Backups With duplicity And ftplicity On Debian Etch When you rent a dedicated server nowadays, almost all providers give you FTP backup space for your server on one of the provider's backup systems. This tutorial shows how you can use duplicity and ftplicity to create encrypted (so that nobody with access to the backup server can read sensitive data in your backups) backups on the provider's remote backup server over FTP. ftplicity is a duplicity wrapper script (provided by the German computer magazine c't) that allows us to use duplicity without interaction (i.e., you do not have to type in any passwords).

    read more... | add comment | view as pdf | print