The Perfect Desktop - PCLinuxOS 2009.1 - Page 3

7 Installing Additional Software

Now, still in Synaptic, we can install additional software. We are going to install the following packages:

  • f-spot
  • picasa
  • opera
  • filezilla
  • evolution
  • amule
  • azureus
  • skype
  • googleearth
  • gnucash
  • gnucash-ofx
  • scribus
  • AdobeReader_enu
  • banshee
  • banshee-ipod
  • gtkpod
  • xmms*
  • dvdrip
  • kino
  • sound-juicer
  • vlc*
  • RealPlayer
  • RealPlayer-rpnp
  • win32-codecs-all
  • totem*
  • xine-ui
  • brasero
  • kompozer
  • bluefish
  • kdewebdev-suite
  • webcore-fonts

You can use Synaptic's Search function to search for the packages:

To select a package for installation, click on the checkbox in front of it and select Mark for Installation from the menu that comes up:

If a package has a dependency that needs to be satisfied, a window will pop up. Accept the dependencies by clicking on Mark:

After you've selected the desired packages, click on the Apply button:

Confirm your selection by clicking on Apply:

The packages are now being downloaded from the repositories and installed. This can take a few minutes, so please be patient:

Afterwards, you can close the Synaptic Package Manager.

 

8 TrueType Fonts

To check if the TrueType fonts have been installed correctly, open a word processor like OpenOffice. You should now find your new Windows fonts there:

 

9 Inventory (II)

Now let's check again what we have so far by browsing the menus again:

Graphics:
[x] The GIMP
[x] F-Spot
[x] Picasa

Internet:
[x] Firefox
[x] Opera
[x] Flash Player
[x] FileZilla
[x] Thunderbird
[x] Evolution
[x] aMule
[x] KTorrent
[x] Azureus
[x] Kopete
[x] Skype
[x] Google Earth
[x] Xchat IRC

Office:
[x] OpenOffice Writer
[x] OpenOffice Calc
[x] Adobe Reader
[x] GnuCash
[x] Scribus

Sound & Video:
[x] Amarok
[x] Banshee
[x] MPlayer
[x] gtkPod
[x] XMMS
[x] dvd::rip
[x] Kino
[x] Sound Juicer CD Extractor
[x] VLC Media Player
[x] Real Player
[x] Totem
[x] Xine
[x] Brasero
[x] K3B
[x] Multimedia-Codecs

Programming:
[x] Kompozer
[x] Bluefish
[x] Quanta Plus

Other:
[ ] VMware Server
[x] True Type fonts
[x] Java
[x] Read/Write Support for NTFS partitions

So everything is installed except for VMware Server...

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From: Stuart at: 2009-07-23 03:19:18

This tutorial actually works perfectly and gave me the necessaries to set up two standalone pc's on linux. Well done!

From: Anonymous at: 2009-10-19 08:28:51

I asked them if i could help with making it work with the I7 .they said no -they comment how good it is I show them the amiga side then they dont want to listen to facts. Amiga is Itanium based intel or rather amiga chipsets one in the same now. Its not the perfect os Amiga is . better then ubuntu -as for me im sticking with fedora and sending my clients over to fedora 11 then 12 . Summary narrow minded has beens -hope they fail. DOnt support a pos of a community.

From: torben at: 2009-04-15 11:57:49

I have used VMWare for the last years, but then some months ago I stumbled upon VirtualBox, and now I don't use anything else. And the best part is how easy it is to install. All I did was add the source to my repolist and "apt-get install virtualbox-2.2" ... :)

Perhaps that would be something for you to look into in future articles?

From: Doryforos at: 2009-03-23 23:55:24

[My initial comment, editted, with better HTML — I just hadn’t gotten right what “Full HTML” means :-( — and more clarity.]

A problem that’s puzzling me with Red Hat / Fedora and derivatives is the default font rendering, especially the way MS (Monotype) Courier New is rendered, and how to change this to the way Debian and derivatives render it.

MS (Monotype) Courier New is by default rendered thin and blurry in PCLOS, which is not what I like. (BTW, this seems to have been also the case with Ubuntu — albeit a Debian derivative — up to version 8.04 non-inclusive.)

The way to change the default Debian rendering is to create a symlink to the file /etc/fonts/conf.avail/10-autohint.conf in /etc/fonts/conf.d/.

My question is: Is there a way to do the reverse in Red Hat and derivatives — i.e. to change their default font rendering to be the same as that of Debian and derivatives? [Since PCLOS < Mandriva < Red Hat, it would be nice to see a tip in a PCLOS Desktop installation, configuration, etc. article such as this.]

From: Doryforos at: 2009-03-23 05:19:31

[not sure whether this belongs here -- please forgive me if it doesn't] A problem that's puzzling me with Red Hat / Fedora and derivatives is the default font rendering, especially the way MS Courier New is rendered, and how to change this to the way Debian and derivatives render it. MS Courier New is by default rendered thin and blurry in PCLOS, which is not what I like. (BTW, this seems to have been also the case with Ubuntu -- albeit a Debian derivative -- up to version 8.04 non-inclusive.) The way to change the default Debian rendering is to create a symlink to the file /etc/fonts/conf.avail/10-autohint.conf in /etc/fonts/conf.d/. My question is: Is there a way to do the reverse in Red Hat and derivatives? [Since PCLOS < Mandriva < Red Hat, it would be nice to see a tip in a PCLOS Desktop installation etc. article such as this.]