The Perfect Desktop - PCLinuxOS 2009.1 - Page 2

3 Flash Player

PCLinuxOS 2009.1 installs the Macromedia Flash Player by default. To see if the Flash plugin is working, start Firefox. Then type about:plugins in the address bar. Firefox will then list all installed plugins, and it should list the Flash Player (version 10.0r15) among them:

 

4 Inventory Of What We Have So Far

Now let's browse all menus to see which of our needed applications are already installed (of course, the Flash plugin isn't listed in the menus because it's a browser plugin - that's why we checked for its existence in the previous chapter). You should find the following situation ([x] marks an application that is already installed, where [ ] is an application that is missing):

Graphics:
[x] The GIMP
[ ] F-Spot
[ ] Picasa

Internet:
[x] Firefox
[ ] Opera
[x] Flash Player
[ ] FileZilla
[x] Thunderbird
[ ] Evolution
[ ] aMule
[x] KTorrent
[ ] Azureus
[x] Kopete
[ ] Skype
[ ] Google Earth
[x] Xchat IRC

Office:
[x] OpenOffice Writer
[x] OpenOffice Calc
[ ] Adobe Reader
[ ] GnuCash
[ ] Scribus

Sound & Video:
[x] Amarok
[ ] Banshee
[x] MPlayer
[ ] gtkPod
[ ] XMMS
[ ] dvd::rip
[ ] Kino
[ ] Sound Juicer CD Extractor
[ ] VLC Media Player
[ ] Real Player
[ ] Totem
[ ] Xine
[ ] Brasero
[x] K3B
[ ] Multimedia-Codecs

Programming:
[ ] Kompozer
[ ] Bluefish
[ ] Quanta Plus

Other:
[ ] VMware Server
[ ] True Type fonts
[x] Java
[x] Read/Write Support for NTFS partitions

So some applications are already on the system. NTFS read-/write support is enabled by default on PCLinuxOS 2009.1, and JAVA is also installed by default.

 

5 Configure Online Software Repositories

Now we configure the online software repositories that our PCLinuxOS 2009.1 system will use to install further software. Click on the Synaptic Package Manager icon in the panel:

We need root privileges to run Synaptic, so we must type in the root password:

After Synaptic has started, we go to Settings > Repositories:

The Repositories window comes up. Select one repository that is close to you. Click on OK afterwards:

A message comes up telling us that we need to click on the Reload button because we have changed the repositories:

That's what we do now: we click on the Reload button in Synaptic:

Our packages database gets updated:

 

6 Update The System

Now, still in Synaptic, we can check for the latest updates. Click on the Mark All Upgrades button. If there are updates available, you can then click on the Apply button to install them (if there are no updates available, the Apply button is greyed out).

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From: Stuart at: 2009-07-23 03:19:18

This tutorial actually works perfectly and gave me the necessaries to set up two standalone pc's on linux. Well done!

From: Anonymous at: 2009-10-19 08:28:51

I asked them if i could help with making it work with the I7 .they said no -they comment how good it is I show them the amiga side then they dont want to listen to facts. Amiga is Itanium based intel or rather amiga chipsets one in the same now. Its not the perfect os Amiga is . better then ubuntu -as for me im sticking with fedora and sending my clients over to fedora 11 then 12 . Summary narrow minded has beens -hope they fail. DOnt support a pos of a community.

From: torben at: 2009-04-15 11:57:49

I have used VMWare for the last years, but then some months ago I stumbled upon VirtualBox, and now I don't use anything else. And the best part is how easy it is to install. All I did was add the source to my repolist and "apt-get install virtualbox-2.2" ... :)

Perhaps that would be something for you to look into in future articles?

From: Doryforos at: 2009-03-23 23:55:24

[My initial comment, editted, with better HTML — I just hadn’t gotten right what “Full HTML” means :-( — and more clarity.]

A problem that’s puzzling me with Red Hat / Fedora and derivatives is the default font rendering, especially the way MS (Monotype) Courier New is rendered, and how to change this to the way Debian and derivatives render it.

MS (Monotype) Courier New is by default rendered thin and blurry in PCLOS, which is not what I like. (BTW, this seems to have been also the case with Ubuntu — albeit a Debian derivative — up to version 8.04 non-inclusive.)

The way to change the default Debian rendering is to create a symlink to the file /etc/fonts/conf.avail/10-autohint.conf in /etc/fonts/conf.d/.

My question is: Is there a way to do the reverse in Red Hat and derivatives — i.e. to change their default font rendering to be the same as that of Debian and derivatives? [Since PCLOS < Mandriva < Red Hat, it would be nice to see a tip in a PCLOS Desktop installation, configuration, etc. article such as this.]

From: Doryforos at: 2009-03-23 05:19:31

[not sure whether this belongs here -- please forgive me if it doesn't] A problem that's puzzling me with Red Hat / Fedora and derivatives is the default font rendering, especially the way MS Courier New is rendered, and how to change this to the way Debian and derivatives render it. MS Courier New is by default rendered thin and blurry in PCLOS, which is not what I like. (BTW, this seems to have been also the case with Ubuntu -- albeit a Debian derivative -- up to version 8.04 non-inclusive.) The way to change the default Debian rendering is to create a symlink to the file /etc/fonts/conf.avail/10-autohint.conf in /etc/fonts/conf.d/. My question is: Is there a way to do the reverse in Red Hat and derivatives? [Since PCLOS < Mandriva < Red Hat, it would be nice to see a tip in a PCLOS Desktop installation etc. article such as this.]