The Perfect Setup - SUSE 9.2 - Page 4

2 Installing And Configuring The Rest Of The System

Configure Additional IP Addresses

If you want to add more IP addresses to your system, simply run


The YaST Control Center will pop up. Go to Network Devices -> Network Card. The next steps are the same as during the network setup in the installation.

Setting The Hostname

echo > /etc/hostname
/bin/hostname -F /etc/hostname

Install apt For SUSE

apt is the packaging system used on Debian. Since it cares much better for package dependencies than rpm it would be nice if we could use it on our new SUSE system. This would save us a lot of hassle. Fortunately, apt has been ported to a lot of rpm based distributions, and is also available for SUSE 9.2 (you will love it... :-)).

rpm -ivh\
rpm -ivh\

Edit /etc/apt/sources.list. It should contain the following line:

rpm SuSE/9.2-i386 base update security


apt-get update

Install Some Software And Deactivate SUSE's Firewall

apt-get install findutils-locate lynx ncftp compat-readline4 gcc glibc-devel flex db-devel rsync

/etc/init.d/SuSEfirewall2_setup stop
chkconfig --del SuSEfirewall2_final
chkconfig --del SuSEfirewall2_setup
chkconfig --del SuSEfirewall2_init


apt-get install quota

Edit /etc/fstab to look like this (I added ,usrquota,grpquota to partition /dev/sda2 (mount point /; your device name might be /dev/hda2 or similar)):

/dev/sda2         /                    reiserfs   acl,user_xattr,usrquota,grpquota        1 1
/dev/sda1 swap swap pri=42 0 0
devpts /dev/pts devpts mode=0620,gid=5 0 0
proc /proc proc defaults 0 0
usbfs /proc/bus/usb usbfs noauto 0 0
sysfs /sys sysfs noauto 0 0
/dev/cdrecorder /media/cdrecorder subfs fs=cdfss,ro,procuid,nosuid,nodev,exec,iocharset=utf8 0 0
/dev/fd0 /media/floppy subfs fs=floppyfss,procuid,nodev,nosuid,sync 0 0

Then run:

touch /quota.user /
chmod 600 /quota.*
mount -o remount /
quotacheck -avugm

quotaon -avug


apt-get install bind bind-chrootenv bind-devel bind-utils

chkconfig --add named
/etc/init.d/named start

Bind will run in a chroot jail under /var/lib/named.


apt-get install mysql mysql-client mysql-shared mysql-devel perl-DBD-mysql perl-DBI perl-Data-ShowTable

chkconfig --add mysql
/etc/init.d/mysql start

Now check that networking is enabled. Run

netstat -tap

It should show a line like this:

tcp        0      0 *:mysql                 *:*                     LISTEN      6621/mysqld

If it does not, edit /etc/my.cnf, comment out the option skip-networking:

# Don't listen on a TCP/IP port at all. This can be a security enhancement,
# if all processes that need to connect to mysqld run on the same host.
# All interaction with mysqld must be made via Unix sockets or named pipes.
# Note that using this option without enabling named pipes on Windows
# (via the "enable-named-pipe" option) will render mysqld useless!

and restart your MySQL server:

/etc/init.d/mysql restart


mysqladmin -u root password yourrootsqlpassword
mysqladmin -h -u root password yourrootsqlpassword

to set a password for the user root (otherwise anybody can access your MySQL database!).

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From: falko