The Perfect Setup - Fedora Core 5 (64-bit) - Page 3

2 Configure Additional IP Addresses

(This section is totally optional. It just shows how to add additional IP addresses to your network interface eth0 if you need more than one IP address. If you're fine with one IP address, you can skip this section.)

Let's assume our network interface is eth0. Then there is a file /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth0 which looks like this:

vi /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth0


Now we want to create the virtual interface eth0:0 with the IP address All we have to do is to create the file /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth0:0 which looks like this (we can leave out the HWADDR line as it is the same physical network card):

vi /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth0:0


Afterwards we have to restart the network:

/etc/init.d/network restart

3 Configure The Firewall

I want to install ISPConfig at the end of this tutorial which comes with its own firewall. That's why I disable the default Fedora firewall now. Of course, you are free to leave it on and configure it to your needs (but then you shouldn't use any other firewall later on as it will most probably interfere with the Fedora firewall).



Select Disabled and press OK.

To check that the firewall has really been disabled, you can run

iptables -L

afterwards. The output should look like this:

[root@server1 ~]# iptables -L
Chain INPUT (policy ACCEPT)
target prot opt source destination

Chain FORWARD (policy ACCEPT)
target prot opt source destination

Chain OUTPUT (policy ACCEPT)
target prot opt source destination

4 Disable SELinux

SELinux is a security extension of Fedora that should provide extended security. In my opinion you don't need it to configure a secure system, and it usually causes more problems than advantages (think of it after you have done a week of trouble-shooting because some service wasn't working as expected, and then you find out that everything was ok, only SELinux was causing the problem). Therefore I disable it (this is a must if you want to install ISPConfig later on).

Edit /etc/selinux/config and set SELINUX=disabled:

vi /etc/selinux/config

# This file controls the state of SELinux on the system.
# SELINUX= can take one of these three values:
# enforcing - SELinux security policy is enforced.
# permissive - SELinux prints warnings instead of enforcing.
# disabled - SELinux is fully disabled.
# SELINUXTYPE= type of policy in use. Possible values are:
# targeted - Only targeted network daemons are protected.
# strict - Full SELinux protection.

Afterwards we must reboot the system:

shutdown -r now

5 Install Some Software

Now we install some software packages that are needed later on:

yum install fetchmail wget bzip2 unzip zip nmap openssl lynx fileutils ncftp gcc gcc-c++

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7 Comment(s)

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From: Anonymous

The given reboot command is incorrect on Fedora core 5. Just use the command "reboot" and it works correctly.

From: Anonymous

Actually "shutdown -r now" works just fine on FC5. it's worked on every redhat version I have used since 2.2 as well as Solaris and SysVR4 -nic

From: Anonymous

try /sbin/shutdown -r 0

From: tommytomato


shutdown -h now

Has worked on every linux OS I have installed, I spose there's are few different ways to doing it. 


shutdown -h now halts the system after the shutdown, shutdown -r now reboots the system and them two commands always work for me on every fedora OS i have installed,

Regards ProServ-UK

From: Anonymous

It's not wrong, it's just a different way of running the same command. On some systems (not sure about Fedora) the 'reboot' command is just an alias to 'shutdown -r now'.

From: Anonymous

Thank you very much for this post!!! I was trying for days to install fedora5 without results. The standard installed firewall and selinux were the two thinks I hang on. Thanks again !!!

b.t.w. I always use: /sbin/reboot