The Perfect Server - Fedora 13 x86_64 [ISPConfig 3] - Page 2

Now we select the software we want to install. Uncheck Graphical Desktop and check Web server instead. Then check Customize now. Afterwards, select the additional repositories Fedora 13 - x86_64 and Fedora 13 - x86_64 - Updates (if you are on an i386 system, the names are probably Fedora 13 - i386 and Fedora 13 - i386 - Updates):

As the last two repositories need an Internet connection, a new window pops up where you have to configure your network card. Select Enable IPv4 support, but disable Use dynamic IP configuration (DHCP); then give your network card a static IP address and netmask (in this tutorial I'm using the IP address 192.168.0.100 and netmask 255.255.255.0 for demonstration purposes; if you are not sure about the right values, http://www.subnetmask.info might help you). Also fill in your gateway (e.g. 192.168.0.1) and one nameserver (e.g. 145.253.2.75):

The details for the last two repositories should now be retrieved, and the checkboxes in front of them should be marked. Click on Next:

Now we must select the package groups we want to install. Select Editors, Text-based Internet, Development Libraries, Development Tools, DNS Name Server, FTP Server, Mail Server, MySQL Database, Server Configuration Tools, Web Server, Administration Tools, Base, Hardware Support, Java, System Tools (unselect all other package groups) and click on Next:

The installation begins. This will take a few minutes:

Finally, the installation is complete, and you can remove your DVD from the computer and reboot it:

After the reboot, you will see this screen. Select Firewall configuration and hit Run Tool:

I want to install ISPConfig at the end of this tutorial which comes with its own firewall. That's why I disable the default Fedora firewall now. Of course, you are free to leave it on and configure it to your needs (but then you shouldn't use any other firewall later on as it will most probably interfere with the Fedora firewall).

Hit OK afterwards:

Confirm your choice by selecting Yes:

Next select Network configuration:

If you did not configure your network card during the installation (because you did not select the additional online repositories), you can do that now by going to Device configuration:

Select your network interface (usually eth0):

Then fill in your network details - disable DHCP and fill in a static IP address, a netmask, and your gateway, then hit Ok:

Next select Save:

What you should do in all cases (regardless of whether you configured your network connection during the installation or just now) is specify nameservers (during the intial installation, you could fill in just one nameserver, therefore you should specify at least a second one now). Select DNS configuration:

Now you can fill in additional nameservers and hit Ok:

Hit Save&Quit afterwards...

... and leave the Choose a Tool window by selecting Quit:

You should run

ifconfig

now to check if the installer got your IP address right.

Now I disable Fedora's NetworkManager and enable "normal" networking. NetworkManager is good for desktops where network connections can change (e.g. LAN vs. WLAN), but on a server you usually don't change network connections:

chkconfig NetworkManager off
chkconfig --levels 35 network on
/etc/init.d/network restart

Check your /etc/resolv.conf if it lists all nameservers that you've previously configured:

cat /etc/resolv.conf

If nameservers are missing, run

system-config-network

and add the missing nameservers again.

Now, on to the configuration...

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From: at: 2010-06-19 14:41:47

Has anyone actually managed to get a Squirrelmail login page for Fedora 13?

I've tried the Fedora 13/ISPConfig3 howto once as written, for an x86-64 PC, and twice using i686 architecture (not replacing lib with lib64).

 All three attempts had as a show-stopper, the non-appearance of Squirrelmail at <http://server1.example.com/webmail>, or at the equivalent address.

Fortunately the CentOS x86-64 equivalent eventually worked, so I'm not under pressure, but it still seems extremely curious that the same issue - lack of any kind of Squirrelmail login interface - hit three different machines running the Fedora 13 - ISPConfig howto.
Neither the configuration test nor the Squirrelmail login work. The config test at <http://server1.example.com/src/configtest.php> fails saying:

"Not Found

The requested URL /src/configtest.php was not found on this server."

- and the login page doesn't appear either. Instead,  at <http://server1.example.com/webmail> we find:

"Unable to connect

 Firefox can't establish a connection to the server at server1.example.com." [or the IP address, or localhost].


It is almost as though the aliases (like webmail for /usr/share/squirrelmail) aren't being established. But the files in /etc/httpd/conf.d are certainly being read, because if I enable server-info, it tells me so.

Besides the Squirrelmail issue, webalyzer doesn't run. Firefox tells me I'm forbidden to access http://server1.example.com/usage.

But, both the phpMyAdmin and the ISPConfig pages do appear. It's not ISPConfig which is causing the Squirrelmail problem because it's installed and tested before ISPConfig is even downloaded.

One other peculiarity: some system users (vmail, getmail, ispapps, and ispconfig)  appear in the Fedora login screen now. I think that's because they have user ID numbers greater than the limit in Fedora for system users (499).

User 500 is always present (it's the one you set during install). vmail has user ID 5000. The others seem to take the user ID from the last ID you created (typically then, 501, 502, and 503).

Can anyone duplicate this? Any ideas?

From: Nick at: 2010-07-08 12:48:17

Try to install mod_ssl!

From: Anonymous at: 2011-10-07 12:26:42

thx. installing mod_ssl helped me with fedora 15 + ispcfg 3 as well

From: at: 2010-07-14 15:51:58

If you select the DNS Name Server category of software to install then "bind-chroot" will be installed. In step 17 there are instructions to install "bind". If both are installed then BIND (named) will not start because named will not be able to find the file named.conf.locate. Even if you create a blank "named.conf.local" in /etc or use ISPConfig web admin to create the file named still will not start. See also, related comments on PG5.

From: Pierre at: 2010-07-19 16:42:10

I don't get the option where I get to choose what to install or not install. I saw on another page where a person was complaining about the fact that the live CD doesn't allow older machines to configure setup as one would want. Sort of idiotic if you think about it! After all Linux is the ideal web server and if you have an older machine laying around you want to setup to tinker on, you won't want any type of GUI. So my question is HOW DO I GET AROUND THIS?

 I have an old Pentium 4 (1.4 GHz) I don't want Gnome or any interface, just the good old command prompt. Unfortunately, I'm a novice and I can't figure out how to get around this.

 Thanks for your help.

From: at: 2010-07-07 00:40:21

After completing all steps in this series and logging in to ISPConfig3 as admin I found that in the 'Monitor' section there was 1 error marked in red.  Clicking on 'more' information revealed that 'MyDNS' was not running. Although MyDNS is not installed as part of this procedure. I assumed that was mis-labeled and that BIND was not starting.

I tried to start BIND (named) manually but it gave an error, stated that the file /etc/named.conf.local was missing which it was missing. But I used the ISPConfig3 to add a client then logged in as that client and created a DNS zone and the named.conf.local file was created.

But when trying to start 'named' I still get the error that /etc/named.conf.local is missing even though it is there. It had the group as 'root' instead of named like the other named.* files had so I chgrp on named.conf.local to named but BIND still won't start and gives the same error that /etc/named.conf.local is missing even though it is present.

If I comment out the include in named.conf for named.conf.local named starts without error even though in the ISPConfig MyDNS still shows 'offline'.

Another file included by named.conf is named.rfc1912.zones it is present and is not mentioned in the error message.

The only difference that I can see is that the permissions on named.rfc1912.zones is "-rw-r-----." were on named.conf.local the perms are "-rw-r--r--" NOTE the period is missing. I have no idea what the period in the permissions list is for but that is the only difference I can see between the two files.

So, how can I fix this and what is the period in the permissions list for?

From: at: 2010-07-19 06:25:27

BIND runs in a chroot environment at /var/named

So the path you are looking for is /var/named/etc/named.conf.local

From: at: 2010-07-14 17:39:43

To get suphp to work I had to add quotes:

x-httpd-suphp=php:/usr/bin/php-cgi
to:
x-httpd-suphp="php:/usr/bin/php-cgi"

refer to

http://www.howtoforge.com/forums/showthread.php?t=47203

From: Serge at: 2010-09-13 20:39:43

Hello,

I was wondering php-mhash is no longer in fedora 13 in fact its stopped since late fc11.

in your install notes you refer to yum php-mhash.... do you have an alternative or this can be skipped?

From: Serge at: 2010-09-12 18:38:13

Hello,

I was wondering php-mhash is no longer in fedora 13 in fact its stopped since late fc11.

in your install notes you refer to yum php-mhash.... do you have an alternative or this can be skipped?

From: Anonymous at: 2010-10-11 14:52:00

Why do you people keep using the comments forms when it specifically says not to? You are not going to get your questions answered here.

From: moodz at: 2010-09-17 08:09:17

If you really want it to work properly look in /tmp/ispconfig3_install/install/dist/conf ... you will see a number of conf files ... I copied the fedora9.conf to fedora13.conf and voila ! the DNS bit starts working !!

Oh and mydns will install OK from yum ....

# yum install mydns

 Otherwise it all works OK.