How To Build A Standalone File Server With Nexenta 3.0 Beta2 - Page 2

Confirm the disk you want to install on:

Take note here. The format for disk labels in Nexenta is not the same as OpenSolaris or Linux. Your disks will be something like c0d0, c0d1, c1d1 etc. This will be important later if/when we add disks to zpools.

You should see the progress bar showing the installation of the base system now.

Next you will be asked to set the root password:

After that, you will create your user. This is similar to the user created in a Ubuntu install. It will have sudo privileges.

Next, define your host information. In this example, I define the host name as server1.example.com.

Next you'll set up your networking. If you are not setting a static IP address, choose DHCP here. Otherwise, enter your static IP, default gateway and DNS server information.

Now the install will complete by setting up services. Once you see the completion screen, eject the media and reboot.

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From: at: 2010-05-04 18:00:54

Nexenta just released 3.0 Beta3.  The instructions are the same between the two release versions for this tutorial.

The download link included will take you to the latest version.

 

Thanks

 

-dfed

From: ci4ic4 at: 2010-12-20 11:09:36

smb/server is not Samba under Nexenta Stor (or any OpenSolaris class system). It is the in-kernel CIFS service, which is incompatible with Samba, so only one or the other can be enabled in any one time on a system. The 'zfs sharesmb=on <zfs>' command relates also only to CIFS, nothing to do with Samba. The capabilities of the two are different, there are occasions one might prefer Samba, most of the time though the CIFS service will be the better choice, as it has full Windows integration (the ACLs are not simulated, but are actual part of the file system).

From: Aristotle Jones at: 2010-08-09 19:57:54

This is a great run down of getting a samba and NFS server up and running.  I wish I had this guide when I built mine, could have saved me a LOT of work.  I would like to add that one will run into trouble if they are trying to create a share for multiple users, specifically when using ACL's from windows.

 As the tutorial really only goes over sharing home folders, you would be fine, but if you create one share, available to several users or groups, and they are writing from windows, you are in for trouble without understanding the ACL's

For Owner full access, read to everyone else use this:
(Note: i used chown on the root of the my share first  i.e. chown -R chris /share)

chmod -R A=\

owner@:wACpdDo:d:allow,\

owner@:wACpdDo:f:allow,\

everyone@:rxaARWcs:d:allow,\

everyone@:raARWcs:f:allow \

/share/

Make sure to TEST!
 
For multiple groups / users on a specific folder, and then recursively add the ACL’’s to any child objects:

chmod -R A=\

owner@:full_set:d:allow,\

owner@:full_set:f:allow,\

user:Bob:full_set:d:allow,\

user:Bob:full_set:f:allow,\

everyone@:rxaARWcs:d:allow,\

everyone@:raARWcs:f:allow \

/share/

The above command gives the owner and the user “Bob” full permissions, the everybody else group has read only access. If you want to add a group then just use group: instead of user: at the start.

This gives full access to myself and Bob, but deny’s access to everyone else;

chmod -R A=\

owner@:full_set:d:allow,\

owner@:full_set:f:allow,\

user:chris:full_set:d:allow,\

user:chris:full_set:f:allow,\

user:Bob:full_set:d:allow,\

user:Bob:full_set:f:allow,\

everyone@:full_set:d:deny,\

everyone@:full_set:f:deny \

/share/photos/

 Hope this helps get you going faster.

From: Anonymous at: 2011-02-07 10:20:03

Remember if you give the full_set to files they are also executable ..... you might not want that on every file ;) especially if you propagate this to every new file in the future.