Virtualization With KVM On A CentOS 6.2 Server - Page 5

8 Creating An LVM-Based Guest From The Command Line

CentOS 6.2 KVM Host:

LVM-based guests have some advantages over image-based guests. They are not as heavy on hard disk IO, and they are easier to back up (using LVM snapshots).

To use LVM-based guests, you need a volume group that has some free space that is not allocated to any logical volume. In this example, I use the volume group /dev/vg_server1 with a size of approx. 465GB...

vgdisplay

[root@server1 ~]# vgdisplay
  --- Volume group ---
  VG Name               vg_server1
  System ID
  Format                lvm2
  Metadata Areas        1
  Metadata Sequence No  5
  VG Access             read/write
  VG Status             resizable
  MAX LV                0
  Cur LV                3
  Open LV               3
  Max PV                0
  Cur PV                1
  Act PV                1
  VG Size               465.27 GiB
  PE Size               4.00 MiB
  Total PE              119109
  Alloc PE / Size       24480 / 95.62 GiB
  Free  PE / Size       94629 / 369.64 GiB
  VG UUID               jk2N5a-pQdV-I49Y-UCR9-A0Js-jEe0-0y6Ipg

[root@server1 ~]#

... that contains the logical volumes /dev/vg_server1/lv_root with a size of approx. 50GB, /dev/vg_server1/lv_home with a size of approx. 40GB, and /dev/vg_server1/lv_swap (about 6GB) - the rest is not allocated and can be used for KVM guests:

lvdisplay

[root@server1 ~]# lvdisplay
  --- Logical volume ---
  LV Name                /dev/vg_server1/lv_root
  VG Name                vg_server1
  LV UUID                il99XH-Q7QV-R16x-Q51X-GOzp-8uq1-aMUb82
  LV Write Access        read/write
  LV Status              available
  # open                 1
  LV Size                50.00 GiB
  Current LE             12800
  Segments               1
  Allocation             inherit
  Read ahead sectors     auto
  - currently set to     256
  Block device           253:0

  --- Logical volume ---
  LV Name                /dev/vg_server1/lv_home
  VG Name                vg_server1
  LV UUID                2OqWO9-4P91-UDzK-K6i3-zgJz-vJWN-9OMXpi
  LV Write Access        read/write
  LV Status              available
  # open                 1
  LV Size                40.00 GiB
  Current LE             10240
  Segments               1
  Allocation             inherit
  Read ahead sectors     auto
  - currently set to     256
  Block device           253:2

  --- Logical volume ---
  LV Name                /dev/vg_server1/lv_swap
  VG Name                vg_server1
  LV UUID                f5e90C-DMt8-896t-MmNo-S2FM-7hSd-gtVGjy
  LV Write Access        read/write
  LV Status              available
  # open                 1
  LV Size                5.62 GiB
  Current LE             1440
  Segments               1
  Allocation             inherit
  Read ahead sectors     auto
  - currently set to     256
  Block device           253:1

[root@server1 ~]#

I will now create the virtual machine vm12 as an LVM-based guest. I want vm12 to have 20GB of disk space, so I create the logical volume /dev/vg_server1/vm12 with a size of 20GB:

lvcreate -L20G -n vm12 vg_server1

Afterwards, we use the virt-install command again to create the guest:

virt-install --connect qemu:///system -n vm12 -r 512 --vcpus=2 --disk path=/dev/vg_server1/vm12 -c /var/lib/libvirt/images/debian-6.0.2.1-amd64-netinst.iso --vnc --noautoconsole --os-type linux --os-variant debiansqueeze --accelerate --network=bridge:br0 --hvm

Please note that instead of --disk path=/var/lib/libvirt/images/vm12.img,size=20 I use --disk path=/dev/vg_server1/vm12, and I don't need to define the disk space anymore because the disk space is defined by the size of the logical volume vm12 (20GB).

Now follow chapter 5 to install that guest.

 

9 Converting Image-Based Guests To LVM-Based Guests

CentOS 6.2 Host:

No let's assume we want to convert our image-based guest vm10 into an LVM-based guest. This is how we do it:

First make sure the guest is stopped:

virsh --connect qemu:///system

shutdown vm10

quit

Then create a logical volume (e.g. /dev/vg_server1/vm10) that has the same size as the image file - the image has 12GB, so the logical volume must have 12GB of size as well:

lvcreate -L12G -n vm10 vg_server1

Now we convert the image:

qemu-img convert /var/lib/libvirt/images/vm10.img -O raw /dev/vg_server1/vm10

Afterwards you can delete the disk image:

rm -f /var/lib/libvirt/images/vm10.img

Now we must open the guest's xml configuration file /etc/libvirt/qemu/vm10.xml...

vi /etc/libvirt/qemu/vm10.xml

... and change the following section...

[...]
    <disk type='file' device='disk'>
      <driver name='qemu' type='raw' cache='none'/>
      <source file='/var/lib/libvirt/images/vm10.img'/>
      <target dev='vda' bus='virtio'/>
      <address type='pci' domain='0x0000' bus='0x00' slot='0x04' function='0x0'/>
    </disk>
[...]

... so that it looks as follows:

[...]
    <disk type='block' device='disk'>
      <driver name='qemu' type='raw' cache='none'/>
      <source dev='/dev/vg_server1/vm10'/>
      <target dev='vda' bus='virtio'/>
      <address type='pci' domain='0x0000' bus='0x00' slot='0x04' function='0x0'/>
    </disk>
[...]

Afterwards we must redefine the guest:

virsh --connect qemu:///system

define /etc/libvirt/qemu/vm10.xml

Still on the virsh shell, we can start the guest...

start vm10

... and leave the virsh shell:

quit

 

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From: Arjan Groenemeijer

It's silly to disable selinux for no reason, especially on a a server. 
Libvirtd  works fine with selinux out of the box.  I hope your next article will be on selinux tricks, just to even things out ...