Linux Tutorials on the topic “monitoring”

  • Network Monitoring Appliance

    ubuntu Author: gbiTags: , , Comments: 9

    Network Monitoring Appliance My ambition was to implement a small (better tiny) appliance for monitoring network health and network resources, short and longtime trends, running under VMware Server or VMware ESX. So I had an eye upon all components which are implemented on the system, to be as leightweight as possible. This was also the reason why no SQL DBMS based software was used. The appliance is based on Ubuntu Jeos LTS (8.04.3 at the time of this writing). Almost all used components are from the related repositories. This tutorial shows how the appliance was implemented.

  • Monitoring Multiple Log Files At A Time With MultiTail On Debian Lenny

    debian Author: Falko TimmeTags: , Comments: 0

    Monitoring Multiple Log Files At A Time With MultiTail On Debian Lenny MultiTail lets you view one or multiple files like the original tail program. The difference is that it creates multiple windows on your console (with ncurses). It can also monitor wildcards: if another file matching the wildcard has a more recent modification date, it will automatically switch to that file. That way you can, for example, monitor a complete directory of files. Merging of two or even more log files is possible.

  • Monitoring Network Latency With Smokeping (Ubuntu 9.04)

    ubuntu Author: Falko TimmeTags: , Comments: 12

    Monitoring Network Latency With Smokeping (Ubuntu 9.04) This guide shows how to install and configure Smokeping on Ubuntu 9.04 to monitor network latency. From the Smokeping web site: "SmokePing is a deluxe latency measurement tool. It can measure, store and display latency, latency distribution and packet loss. SmokePing uses RRDtool to maintain a longterm data-store and to draw pretty graphs, giving up to the minute information on the state of each network connection."

  • Configure OpenNMS Step By Step

    Author: saad khanTags: Comments: 10

    Network Management With OpenNMS OpenNMS is an opensource enterprise network management tool. It helps network administrators to monitor critical services on remote machines and collects the information of remote nodes by using SNMP. OpenNMS has a very active community, where you can register yourself to discuss your problems. Normally openNMS installation and configuration takes time, but I have tried to cover the installation and configuration part in a few steps.

  • Deny Or Allow Countries With Apache .htaccess

    Author: marchostTags: , , , Comments: 0

    Deny Or Allow Countries With Apache .htaccess The following script is using blogama.org IP geolocation API to automatically generate Apache .htaccess file to deny or allow specific countries. You can put this script under crontab and the .htaccess rules will be automatically updated. Also, it can update multiple .htaccess files.

  • Simple Bash Script To Monitor Your Webserver Remotely On Different Ports

    Author: marchostTags: , , Comments: 2

    Simple Bash Script To Monitor Your Webserver Remotely On Different Ports Simple bash script to monitor a webserver on different ports (here smtp, dns, http & https but it can be customized); I'm sure there are over 100 available programs doing this but I wanted something with small memory usage. Also, I only wanted to be notified once, notifications are received by SMS on my cell. With the software I was using before, I was getting notified every minute until I could reach a computer and fix the problem or stop monitoring which was quite annoying.

  • Server Monitoring With munin And monit On CentOS 5.2

    centos Author: Falko TimmeTags: , Comments: 11

    Server Monitoring With munin And monit On CentOS 5.2 In this article I will describe how you can monitor your CentOS 5.2 server with munin and monit. munin produces nifty little graphics about nearly every aspect of your server (load average, memory usage, CPU usage, MySQL throughput, eth0 traffic, etc.) without much configuration, whereas monit checks the availability of services like Apache, MySQL, Postfix and takes the appropriate action such as a restart if it finds a service is not behaving as expected. The combination of the two gives you full monitoring: graphics that lets you recognize current or upcoming problems (like "We need a bigger server soon, our load average is increasing rapidly."), and a watchdog that ensures the availability of the monitored services.

  • How To Make monit Send SMS Alerts When Your Server Goes Down

    Author: Falko TimmeTags: , Comments: 9

    How To Make monit Send SMS Alerts When Your Server Goes Down This tutorial explains how you can configure monit to send alert messages per SMS to your mobile phone when a service fails. Because monit can send only emails but not SMS, we will use an email-to-sms gateway where monit will send its emails to, and the email-to-sms gateway will convert the emails to SMS messages.

  • Monitoring UPS Power Status Using Network UPS Tools (NUT) 2.2.0 on Multiple OpenSuSE 10.3 Servers

    Author: kianTags: , , Comments: 3

    Monitoring UPS Power Status Using Network UPS Tools (NUT) 2.2.0 on Multiple OpenSuSE 10.3 Servers Network UPS Tools is a collection of programs which provide a common interface for monitoring and administering UPS hardware. The primary goal of the Network UPS Tools (NUT) project is to provide reliable monitoring of UPS hardware and ensure safe shutdowns of the systems which are connected. This document describes how to configure one machine connected to the UPS so it monitors the power status. This can relay alerts to other machines that are running off the same power line. This way, multiple servers can perform a safe shutdown in case of power failure.

  • Monitoring With Groundwork Open Source On CentOS 5.1

    Author: shakey_1Tags: , Comments: 4

    Monitoring With Groundwork Open Source On CentOS 5.1 Nagios is (in my opinion) one of the finest availability and monitoring solutions available. The stability, extendability and cost effectiveness (it is free under the GPL), are second to none (again, my opinion). That being said, it is far from being the easiest monitoring solution to implement. The build process itself, while not being overly complicated, can be vexing to new Linux users. That doesn't even include the configuration, which sometimes still makes me cringe.