The Perfect Desktop - Linux Mint 7 (Gloria) - Page 3

7 Install Additional Software

To install additional applications, open the Synaptic Package Manager (Applications > Administration > Synaptic Package Manager):

In the Synaptic Package Manager, we can install additional software. You can use the Quick search field to find packages:

Select the following packages for installation (* is a wildcard; e.g. gstreamer0.10* means all packages that start with gstreamer0.10):

  • f-spot
  • picasa
  • opera
  • filezilla
  • evolution
  • amule
  • azureus
  • skype
  • googleearth
  • acroread
  • gnucash
  • scribus
  • amarok
  • audacity
  • banshee
  • sound-juicer
  • gtkpod-aac
  • xmms2*
  • dvdrip
  • kino
  • vlc*
  • mozilla-plugin-vlc
  • helix-player
  • mozilla-helix-player
  • xine-ui
  • xine-plugin
  • k3b
  • normalize-audio
  • sox
  • vcdimager
  • non-free-codecs
  • gstreamer0.10*
  • kompozer
  • bluefish
  • quanta
  • msttcorefonts
  • sun-java6* (except sun-java6-doc)
  • virtualbox-2.2

There are also lots of other applications available that you can install as well if you like.

To select a package for installation, click on the checkbox in front of it and select Mark for Installation from the menu that comes up:

If a package has a dependency that needs to be satisfied, a window will pop up. Accept the dependencies by clicking on Mark:

After you've selected the desired packages, click on the Apply button:

Confirm your selection by clicking on Apply:

The packages are now being downloaded from the repositories and installed. This can take a few minutes, so please be patient:

Some packages require that you accept their licenses (for example googleearth):

The installation continues:

You might also see some other messages. Click on Forward to continue the installation:

After all packages have been installed, click on Close:

You can leave the Synaptic Package Manager afterwards.

To finish the VirtualBox installation, we must add the user that will run VirtualBox (falko in this example) to the vboxusers group. Open a terminal (Applications > Accessories > Terminal)...

... and run:

sudo usermod -G vboxusers -a falko

 

8 Inventory (II)

Now let's check again what we have so far by browsing the menus again:

We have now all wanted applications installed:

Graphics:
[x] The GIMP
[x] F-Spot
[x] Picasa

Internet:
[x] Firefox
[x] Opera
[x] Flash Player
[x] FileZilla
[x] Thunderbird
[x] Evolution
[x] aMule
[x] Transmission BitTorrent Client
[x] Azureus/Vuze
[x] Pidgin
[x] Skype
[x] Google Earth
[x] Xchat IRC

Office:
[x] OpenOffice Writer
[x] OpenOffice Calc
[x] Adobe Reader
[x] GnuCash
[x] Scribus

Sound & Video:
[x] Amarok
[x] Audacity
[x] Banshee
[x] MPlayer
[x] Rhythmbox Music Player
[x] gtkPod
[x] XMMS
[x] dvd::rip
[x] Kino
[x] Sound Juicer CD Extractor
[x] VLC Media Player
[x] Helix Player
[x] Totem
[x] Xine
[x] Brasero
[x] K3B
[x] Multimedia-Codecs

Programming:
[x] KompoZer
[x] Bluefish
[x] Quanta Plus

Other:
[x] VirtualBox
[x] TrueType fonts
[x] Java
[x] Read/Write support for NTFS partitions

Microsoft's TrueType fonts are now installed, you can check that for example by opening the OpenOffice Writer. Take a look at the available fonts, and you should find fonts such as Arial, Times New Roman, Verdana, etc.:

 

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From: Fred Williams at: 2009-06-02 20:18:22

Thanks for sharing how you would setup Mint, please stop referencing Mono based applications.

Try bluemarine for a photo manager instead of f-spot.

 

Also when you first install an Ubuntu based derivative please run the following:

sudo aptitude purge mono-common libmono0

This is safe, it just removes the trojan called Mono.

 

From: Anonymous at: 2009-06-29 19:08:51

Just for my own edification - what is the problem with mono?

From: Kilikopele at: 2010-02-23 02:17:11

Nothing at all.  There are just folks who will automatically hate it because it's bringing a M$ technology to Linux (thus the cliched "virus" comment.)

From: bookworm1960a at: 2009-05-29 17:20:53

Very well written and easy to follow

From: Anonymous at: 2009-06-04 04:21:01

Now please do the same with MS on a clean machine with no OS installed. Go out and buy  MS Vista or its latest, MS office latest,  Photoshop, and all the other proprietary software mentioned. Let us know how long it takes to install and learn how to use all of it.

From: Anonymous at: 2009-06-10 19:38:21

Why?!! Who these days would actually "go out and buy" full versions of Vista, MS Office, Adobe Phototshop and all the rest simply to see how long it takes to install such incredibly expensive proprietary software into a working configuration on a "clean machine"? ..Who gives a rip when you can do everything needed with today's free open source applications on Linux MINT 7 or any of the other high end distros that are available, all the while pocketing those dollars to spend on things that actually matter?!

From: Anonymous at: 2009-06-18 17:56:30

I think they were being sarcastic.

From: Anonymous at: 2009-06-24 14:06:55

First time user of Linux. I wonder why there no antivirusprogram like AVG Free for Linux in the wanted program list? And how about firewalls?

Second: Most of the time there is a warning : "You are about to install software that cannot be authenticated etc".  Even in the tutorial. How save is Linux??

From: Anonymous at: 2009-07-27 01:23:24

The reason you can't find any anti-virus program is because there pretty much are no viruses for Linux. A firewall shouldn't be necessary either. You probably don't have to worry about the authentication warning either. Good luck with Linux and don't be afraid to ask if you need help.

From: Anonymous at: 2010-01-03 18:46:12

There is a common perception that there are no viruses on the Linux platform - which to a large extent is true. But what happens when you get a mail attachment which you would like to forward to your windows machine so you can open it with your favorite proprietary software? And what if this attachment is infected by a virus? This is where the anti virus solutions for linux comes into the picture.

ClamAV is a free GPLed anti-virus solution which provides a lot of advantages when installed in Linux. Sticking to the philosophy of linux, it contains a set of command line tools which can be used to check if a file on your system is infected by a virus.

From: at: 2009-09-21 14:50:15

Thank you very much falko, it was very intersting and informative to read your article. Nice job!

From: Anonymous at: 2010-03-11 02:05:53

This really helped a lot....thanks

From: Anonymous at: 2012-10-21 16:48:36

Hi,

 Um just curios with the linux Os and wanna try it out to find how it feels like. I knw Linux mint 7 is way old. But I just have the DVD and wanna install it.

1. Will it be problem if I select "Use the entire disk" when the installation is in progress.? I mean will it cause any damage or mess up the win 7 performance.? (I have a dual core machine) - I wanna have both Win 7 and Mint 7...

2. Is it possible to choose the OS when start up.? (I don't wanna run it through a DVD)