The Perfect Desktop - Linux Mint 6 (Felicia) - Page 4

7 Install Additional Software

To install additional applications, open the Synaptic Package Manager (Applications > Administration > Synaptic Package Manager):

Type in your password:

In the Synaptic Package Manager, we can install additional software. You can use the Quick search field to find packages:

Select the following packages for installation (* is a wildcard; e.g. gstreamer0.10* means all packages that start with gstreamer0.10):

  • f-spot
  • picasa
  • opera
  • filezilla
  • evolution
  • amule
  • azureus
  • skype
  • googleearth
  • acroread
  • acroread-escript
  • acroread-plugins
  • mozilla-acroread
  • gnucash
  • scribus
  • amarok
  • audacity
  • banshee
  • sound-juicer
  • gtkpod-aac
  • xmms2*
  • dvdrip
  • kino
  • vlc*
  • mozilla-plugin-vlc
  • helix-player
  • mozilla-helix-player
  • xine-ui
  • xine-plugin
  • k3b
  • normalize-audio
  • sox
  • vcdimager
  • non-free-codecs
  • gstreamer0.10*
  • kompozer
  • bluefish
  • quanta
  • msttcorefonts
  • sun-java6* (except sun-java6-doc)

There are also lots of other applications available that you can install as well if you like.

To select a package for installation, click on the checkbox in front of it and select Mark for Installation from the menu that comes up:

If a package has a dependency that needs to be satisfied, a window will pop up. Accept the dependencies by clicking on Mark:

After you've selected the desired packages, click on the Apply button:

Confirm your selection by clicking on Apply:

The packages are now being downloaded from the repositories and installed. This can take a few minutes, so please be patient:

Some packages require that you accept their licenses (for example googleearth):

The installation continues:

After all packages have been installed, click on Close:

You can leave the Synaptic Package Manager afterwards.

 

8 Inventory (II)

Now let's check again what we have so far by browsing the menus again:

Our inventory should now look like this:

Graphics:
[x] The GIMP
[x] F-Spot
[x] Picasa

Internet:
[x] Firefox
[x] Opera
[x] Flash Player
[x] FileZilla
[x] Thunderbird
[x] Evolution
[x] aMule
[x] Transmission BitTorrent Client
[x] Azureus/Vuze
[x] Pidgin
[x] Skype
[x] Google Earth
[x] Xchat IRC

Office:
[x] OpenOffice Writer
[x] OpenOffice Calc
[x] Adobe Reader
[x] GnuCash
[x] Scribus

Sound & Video:
[x] Amarok
[x] Audacity
[x] Banshee
[x] MPlayer
[x] Rhythmbox Music Player
[x] gtkPod
[x] XMMS
[x] dvd::rip
[x] Kino
[x] Sound Juicer CD Extractor
[x] VLC Media Player
[x] Helix Player
[x] Totem
[x] Xine
[x] Brasero
[x] K3B
[x] Multimedia-Codecs

Programming:
[x] KompoZer
[x] Bluefish
[x] Quanta Plus

Other:
[ ] VMware Server
[x] TrueType fonts
[x] Java
[x] Read/Write support for NTFS partitions

Microsoft's TrueType fonts are now installed, you can check that for example by opening the OpenOffice Writer. Take a look at the available fonts, and you should find fonts such as Arial, Times New Roman, Verdana, etc.:

So everything is installed except for VMware Server...

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From: Chris at: 2008-12-30 17:38:07

As usual Falko knocked another one out of the park.  Nice work.

 In case anyone wants it here is the apt-get command for installing the above files:

apt-get install f-spot picasa opera filezilla evolution amule azureus skype googleearth acroread acroread-escript acroread-plugins mozilla-acroread gnucash scribus amarok audacity banshee sound-juicer gtkpod-aac xmms2* dvdrip kino vlc* mozilla-plugin-vlc helix-player mozilla-helix-player xine-ui xine-plugin k3b normalize-audio sox vcdimager non-free-codecs gstreamer0.10* kompozer bluefish quanta msttcorefonts

It doesn't include sun-java6.  I think it is easier to do from command line but I also understand the idea behind the tutorial.

From: mchlbk at: 2008-12-17 21:47:27

Fine how-to.

Wouldn't setting up something similar to MS Windows' System Restore be essential to potential Windows converts' acceptance of Mint as a real alternative to XP/Vista? And how would you do that?

From: Briester at: 2009-01-12 21:05:32

@mchlbk

My reply is a bit late but I just saw the posting today.

Linux has something called a cron that can be set to periodically run at certain times of the day/week/whenever.

It's actually much easier than system restore and more reliable to setup a job in the cron to just run once a week or so and capture your " / " partition files to a tarball (.tar) file and save them to another partition or external device.

See this website here:  http://www.linuxhelp.net/guides/cron/

 Good luck!

Chris 

From: Anonymous at: 2008-12-18 20:25:49

Why not virtualbox?  it is a hell of lot easier to install and maintain for the average user.  And besides, you dont have to mess with that browser garbage.

From: Chuck at: 2008-12-19 20:09:20

Mint is a great Distro. I have used for for a few years, but the one I have found to be newbie friendly, and also powerfull is Pardus 2008.1.

The only negative thing I can say about Pardus is that the repositories are light compared to the Ubuntu/Mint.

Great write up on Mint it is a fine distro.

 

CM Hudson

Edgewood NM

From: Anonymous at: 2008-12-19 04:13:35

It should be mentioned that Skype doesn't work unless you reset all the Skype audio options to Pulse. Even then the audio isn't as good as it is under Mint 5.  Also to avoid error problems with virtualbox one should download the non free version.

From: Anonymous at: 2008-12-19 04:16:57

It should be mentioned that Skype doesn't work unless you reset all the Skype audio options to Pulse. Even then the audio isn't as good as it is under Mint 5.  Also to avoid error problems with Virtualbox one should download the non free version.