Articles by joe

  • Building A Debian DNS System

    Author: joeTags: , Comments: 3

    Building A Debian DNS System Version 1.0 Author: Joe Topjian <joe [at] adminspotting [dot] net> Last edited 11/01/2005 OK, this is the last DNS article... for a while, at least. This article will show you how to build a complete DNS System with Debian. This includes a Master server, a Slave server, DDNS, and a bunch of DNSSEC. I'll be using BIND 9 for the server.

  • Virtual Hosting with Postfix, part one

    Author: joeTags: Comments: 9

    Version 1.0 Author: Joe Topjian <joe [at] adminspotting [dot] net> Last edited 04/11/2005 The virtual domain support in Postfix is actually quite robust. There are three different ways you host virtual domains with Postfix and they're all described here. We'll be looking at the third one: separate domains and non-unix accounts. Why this one? Because in the end, this options gives us the most flexibility. It's a little more complicated to set up and understand but well worth it when you're hosting several domains.

  • Virtual Hosting with Postfix, part two

    Author: joeTags: Comments: 4

    Version 1.0 Author: Joe Topjian <joe [at] adminspotting [dot] net> Last edited 04/15/2005 This article will pick up where the last one left off: how to actually retrieve the email we're storing in our virtual accounts. In the first article, I explained how we're using the third type of Postfix virtual hosting which is to use separate domains and non-unix accounts. The separate domains portion was covered fairly well. Now it's time to work on the non-unix accounts.

  • Secure and Private Browsing with Squid

    Author: joeTags: Comments: 12

    Version 1.0 Author: Joe Topjian <joe [at] adminspotting [dot] net> Last edited 05/02/2005 Browsing a site that supports SSL is a definite way to make sure no one can snoop in on what you're doing -- which is a good thing when you're doing something personal like checking email over the web or buying something from amazon. But if you're just doing stuff like reading the daily news or checking movie times, is privacy that important? The ultra-paranoid will give a resounding "yes" to that question while most people will just shrug. I find myself in between those two parties. At home while I'm reading the news, I could care less if the traffic is encrypted or not. However, when I'm at a public wi-fi spot, it does bother me a bit.