How To Create A Cluster Testbed Using CentOS 5 Virtualization And iSCSI - Page 3

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Submitted by xwangbu (Contact Author) (Forums) on Thu, 2008-07-17 04:16. ::

E. iSCSI

iSCSI is a Storage Area Network protocol allowing shared storage going through an exising network infrastructure. In my setup, I used iscsitarget from http://iscsitarget.sourceforge.net.

 

1. iSCSI server installation and configuration

1.a compiling the iscsi application tarball

This needs to be done on the physical host.

  • Get the tarball from SourceForge and put it in /usr/local/src.
  • cd to /usr/local/src:

    cd /usr/local/src

  • Then extract the files:

    tar xvf iscsitarget-0.4.16.tar.gz
    cd iscsitarget-0.4.16

  • Then run:

    make
    make install

1.b configuration needed

This is my ietd.conf configuration defining the "LUNs" to be allocated to the guests from the physical host's disks:

#/etc/ietd.conf
# NOTE: the config files has more entries than what i'm showing here.
# but i've commented out the original entries and made the following
Target iqn.2008-07.NODE00:LUN01.NODE00
   MaxConnections         2
   Lun 1 Path=/dev/Virtual00VG/lvLUN01,Type=fileio
   Alias LUN01
Target iqn.2008-07.NODE00:LUN02.NODE00
   MaxConnections         2
   Lun 2 Path=/dev/Virtual00VG/lvLUN02,Type=fileio
   Alias LUN02
# end of ietd.conf

In my physical host system, I have created two logical volumes 50G each in size. You can also use files or disk partitions, just change the Path entries in the ietd.conf file.

1.c ACL

iscsitarget has /etc/initiators.allow and /etc/initiators.deny that work like hosts.allow and hosts.deny. In my setup, I will allow node01 and node02 to access the two LUNs defined in ietd.conf.

#/etc/initiators.allow
#this should correspond to the definition in your /etc/ietd.conf
iqn.2008-07.NODE00:LUN01.NODE00 192.168.100.10, 192.168.100.20
iqn.2008-07.NODE00:LUN02.NODE00 192.168.100.10, 192.168.100.20
# endof initiators.allow
  • Start the iscsi-target service:

    service iscsi-target start

  • and make sure it starts during bootup:

    chkconfig --add iscsi-target
    chkconfig iscsi-target on
    chkconfig --list iscsi-target

    iscsi-target 0:off 1:off 2:on 3:on 4:on 5:on 6:off

 

2 Client Side

The package iscsi-initiator-utils-6.2.0.865-0.8.el5 should already be installed (as it is included in the kickstart file above).

2.a configuration

  • Edit the file /etc/iscsi/initiatorname.iscsi to define the targets.
  • My /etc/iscsi/initiatorname.iscsi is as follows:
    #/etc/iscsi/initiatorname.iscsi
    InitiatorName=iqn.2008-07.NODE00:LUN01.NODE00
    InitiatorName=iqn.2008-07.NODE00:LUN02.NODE00
    # end of #/etc/iscsi/initiatorname.iscsi
    
  • Run iscsid service and try to discover the LUNs:

    service iscsid start

    Turning off network shutdown. Starting iSCSI daemon: [ OK ]

    iscsiadm -m discovery -t st -p node00

    192.168.222.1:3260,1 iqn.2008-07.NODE00:LUN01.NODE00
    192.168.222.1:3260,1 iqn.2008-07.NODE00:LUN02.NODE00

  • Then start the iscsi service. You'll then see the LUN definitions created earlier:

    service iscsi start

    will then show the following:

    	iscsid (pid 964 963) is running...
    	Setting up iSCSI targets: Login session [iface: default, target: \
    
    	iqn.2008-07.NODE00:LUN02.NODE00, portal: 192.168.222.1,3260]
    	Login session [iface: default, target: iqn.2008-07.NODE00:LUN01.\
    	NODE00, portal: 192.168.222.1,3260] [  OK  ]
    
  • Check system logs to see if the disks have been seen:

    dmesg

            scsi0 : iSCSI Initiator over TCP/IP

    Vendor: IET Model: VIRTUAL-DISK Rev: 0 Type: Direct-Access ANSI SCSI revision: 04 scsi 0:0:0:2: Attached scsi generic sg0 type 0 SCSI device sda: 104857600 512-byte hdwr sectors (53687 MB) sda: Write Protect is off sda: Mode Sense: 77 00 00 08 SCSI device sda: drive cache: write through SCSI device sda: 104857600 512-byte hdwr sectors (53687 MB) sda: Write Protect is off sda: Mode Sense: 77 00 00 08 SCSI device sda: drive cache: write through sda: unknown partition table sd 0:0:0:2: Attached scsi disk sda scsi1 : iSCSI Initiator over TCP/IP Vendor: IET Model: VIRTUAL-DISK Rev: 0 Type: Direct-Access ANSI SCSI revision: 04 SCSI device sdb: 104857600 512-byte hdwr sectors (53687 MB) sdb: Write Protect is off sdb: Mode Sense: 77 00 00 08 SCSI device sdb: drive cache: write through SCSI device sdb: 104857600 512-byte hdwr sectors (53687 MB) sdb: Write Protect is off sdb: Mode Sense: 77 00 00 08 SCSI device sdb: drive cache: write through sdb: unknown partition table sd 1:0:0:1: Attached scsi disk sdb sd 1:0:0:1: Attached scsi generic sg1 type 0

    I now have sda and sdb, each with 53687 MB in size (results for your setup may be different.

  • Running fdisk:

    fdisk -l

            Disk /dev/xvda: 32.2 GB, 32212254720 bytes
            255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 3916 cylinders
            Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    
    
                Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
            /dev/xvda1   *           1          13      104391   83  Linux
            /dev/xvda2              14        3916    31350847+  8e  Linux LVM
    
            Disk /dev/sda: 53.6 GB, 53687091200 bytes
            64 heads, 32 sectors/track, 51200 cylinders
            Units = cylinders of 2048 * 512 = 1048576 bytes
    
            Disk /dev/sda doesn't contain a valid partition table
    
    
            Disk /dev/sdb: 53.6 GB, 53687091200 bytes
            64 heads, 32 sectors/track, 51200 cylinders
            Units = cylinders of 2048 * 512 = 1048576 bytes
    
            Disk /dev/sdb doesn't contain a valid partition table
    

Now do the same for node02. Once the disks are seen by both guests, you can then start setting up a two-node cluster. I've used this configuration to test a two-node Oracle 10gR2 RAC setup with shared ASM storage and OCFS2 on a 64-bit system.

 

F. Conclusion

This kind of setup will help you to learn the basics of clustering without the need of acquiring additional hardware. In no way can this setup be used in a "live" environment. Once you have familiarized yourself with the concept of how a cluster is prepared, you can apply the concept when building real, physical setups that you need for your organization. I hope you'll find this useful.

 

G. Further Readings


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