ISP-Server Setup - Ubuntu 5.0.4 "The Hoary Hedgehog"

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Submitted by till (Contact Author) (Forums) on Sat, 2005-09-17 12:42. :: ISPConfig | Ubuntu

This is a "copy & paste" HowTo! The easiest way to follow this tutorial is to use a command line client/SSH client (like PuTTY for Windows) and simply copy and paste the commands (except where you have to provide own information like IP addresses, hostnames, passwords,...). This helps to avoid typos.

ISP-Server Setup - Ubuntu 5.0.4 "The Hoary Hedgehog"

Version 1.0
Author: Till Brehm <t.brehm [at] ispconfig [dot] org>, Falko Timme <ft [at] falkotimme [dot] com>
Last edited 09/16/2005

This is a detailed description about the steps to be taken to setup a Ubuntu based server (Ubuntu 5.0.4 - The Hoary Hedgehog) that offers all services needed by ISPs and hosters (web server (SSL-capable), mail server (with SMTP-AUTH and TLS!), DNS server, FTP server, MySQL server, POP3/POP3s/IMAP/IMAPs, Quota, Firewall, etc.).

I will use the following software:

  • Web Server: Apache 2.0.x
  • Mail Server: Postfix (easier to configure than sendmail; has a shorter history of security holes than sendmail)
  • DNS Server: BIND9
  • FTP Server: proftpd
  • POP3/POP3s/IMAP/IMAPs: in this example you can choose between the traditional UNIX mailbox format (we then use ipopd/uw-imapd) or the Maildir format (in this case we will use Courier-POP3/Courier-IMAP).
  • Webalizer for web site statistics

In the end you should have a system that works reliably and is ready for the free webhosting control panel ISPConfig (i.e., ISPConfig runs on it out of the box).

I want to say first that this is not the only way of setting up such a system. There are many ways of achieving this goal but this is the way I take. I do not issue any guarantee that this will work for you!

Requirements

To install such a system you will need the following:

  • A Ubuntu install CD (available here: http://www.ubuntu.com/download/)
  • An internet connection since I will describe a network installation in this document.

1 The Base System

Insert your Ubuntu install CD into your system and boot from it (enter server at the boot prompt to install only a base system suitable for servers).

The installation starts, and first you have to choose your language:

Chose your location:

Choose a keyboard layout:

The hardware detection starts:

Enter the hostname. In this example, my system is called server1.example.com, so I enter server1:


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Submitted by Anonymous (not registered) on Sun, 2006-01-29 18:47.

would this be a better starting point?

would it change everything in this howto?

http://distrowatch.com/?newsid=02988#0

Submitted by admin (registered user) on Sun, 2006-01-29 19:26.

The ubuntu server distribution did not exist at the time I've written this howto. I'am pretty sure that the howto will work fine with Ubuntu Server distribution too, but I've not tested it yet.

Till

Submitted by Anonymous (not registered) on Mon, 2005-12-19 17:44.
thanks for the walk through only had Ubuntu installed (or any type of Linux) for a couple of days and I'm already runing my own server...pure magic
Submitted by Anonymous (not registered) on Mon, 2005-10-10 03:01.

You mention that Postfix has a shorter list of security vulnerabilities than Sendmail. In the recent times, Sendmail has performed very well. Also keep in mind that Sendmail is over 23 years old -- it's had a lot more time to be tested for these things. If you mentioned that Postfix scales better than Sendmail, I'd have marked that as credable; however, Sendmail's M4 configuration is so easy that even a monkey could do it.

As a software package, Sendmail works great. It is easy to configure. It has proven itself secure in the recent years. Don't knock it for the wrong things.

Submitted by Anonymous (not registered) on Wed, 2005-11-16 23:54.

May be you'd check more. Postfix is designed basically to be a secure alternative to Sendmail, check its site. And it does have a better record.

I'd say the worst thing about sendmail is the configuration, by the way. Probably you are a M4 veteran, so you don't know how complicated it is. Frankly, that was the reason I switched from sendmail to postfix, circa redhat 7.3, before it became their default. And I am not really a newbie..