Running Windows Programs On Ubuntu 8.10 With CrossOver Linux Pro 7.1.0

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Submitted by falko (Contact Author) (Forums) on Fri, 2008-11-28 11:43. :: Ubuntu

Running Windows Programs On Ubuntu 8.10 With CrossOver Linux Pro 7.1.0

Version 1.0
Author: Falko Timme <ft [at] falkotimme [dot] com>
Last edited 11/06/2008

This guide shows how you can use CrossOver Linux Pro 7.1.0 to run Windows applications on Ubuntu 8.10. CrossOver is based on Wine. It is not available for free, but maybe you are one of the lucky guys that grabbed a CrossOver copy for free a few days ago; otherwise you can install a 30-day trial version to test it.

This document comes without warranty of any kind! I do not issue any guarantee that this will work for you!

 

1 Installing CrossOver Linux Pro

Visit the Codeweavers web site and grab a trial version, or log in to your existing Codeweavers account. There's a CrossOver Pro .deb package available for Debian and Ubuntu systems - download that one to your hard drive (e.g. /home/falko/Desktop). The Open with GDebi Package Installer (default) option does not work here for some strange reason, it gives back an error.

Then open a terminal (Applications > Accessories > Terminal)...

... and go to the directory where you've saved CrossOver Pro:

cd /home/falko/Desktop/

You can install it with the following command:

sudo dpkg -i crossover-pro_7.1.0-1_i386.deb

Afterwards, you can delete the .deb file to clean up your system:

rm -f crossover-pro_7.1.0-1_i386.deb

 

2 Installing Windows Applications

To install Windows applications, go to Applications > CrossOver > Install Windows Software:

The CrossOver Installation Wizard starts. You can now select to install one of the listed ("supported") applications, or you can select to install unsupported software if your desired Windows application is not listed. Please make sure that you have the installation media of your desired application (CD/DVD, setup.exe file, etc.) at hand because in most cases the wizard will ask for it. In this example I select to install Internet Explorer 6. Because CrossOver can download IE6 directly from the Internet, I don't need any installation media for this example.

Select Express Install or Advanced Install:

Afterwards, simply click your way through the wizard:

Click on Finish to complete the installation:

Afterwards, you can find your Windows application under Applications > Windows Applications (or there is an icon for it on the desktop):

If all goes well, your Windows application should start without problems:

 

3 Links


Please do not use the comment function to ask for help! If you need help, please use our forum.
Comments will be published after administrator approval.
Submitted by engrmudasir (not registered) on Sat, 2012-03-03 21:39.
This question was common some days before, so i decided to write on it and after a long time of my effort i just sorted the problem out. Literally i was happy because i was having another topic to write on my website.

Follow the link and don't forget to give your feedback.

Installing Windows Applications on Ubuntu

I will feel good after the response of you guys, respond with your feedback.
Submitted by Anonymous (not registered) on Mon, 2009-02-16 05:09.

Hi

If anyone heard of conference.exe or webinar.exe that is conference calls and text over the internet with multiple people.  Would that work running Crossover Linux and NewNetmail, and other programs. or is it have to be what on the list available that works?

Submitted by Anonymous (not registered) on Sat, 2012-03-03 21:50.
Submitted by Anonymous (not registered) on Sun, 2008-12-28 04:52.

whoa you guys are cranky!

this hole thing is great, a step by step how to throug all that linux distro is a great idea for a neo like me. can it run e64 or other wins 64bit application?

kept up the good work!

Submitted by Anonymous (not registered) on Fri, 2008-12-05 00:59.

What does this have to do with MySQL ... why are you spamming planet MySQL with things that have nothing to do with MySQL.

Submitted by Jon Parshall (not registered) on Tue, 2008-12-02 22:42.

Glad it worked well for you--we appreciate the feedback.

By the way, regarding the comments regarding needing to use the terminal for Linux--most Linux distros these days are bright enough in package management to know what to do with the various packages we supply (.deb, rpm, etc.) without needing to resort to a terminal. I'm hardly a Linux guru, but I ran Ubuntu for years quite successfully without much problem. I'm on a MacBook Pro at the moment, though, and that's nice, too.

Best Wishes,

-jon parshall-

COO

http://www.codeweavers.com

Submitted by Gerry (not registered) on Mon, 2008-12-01 19:59.
Even old versions of MS FS are better than Flight Gear. Any chance? Gerry
Submitted by mohan (not registered) on Sat, 2008-11-29 23:07.
It will be a good one to use windows and run Linux...good Illustrations...
Submitted by Anonymous (not registered) on Sat, 2008-11-29 16:17.
much better to run Windows and use andLinux, best of both worlds without the hassle.
Submitted by Anony-mouse (not registered) on Sat, 2008-11-29 05:47.
Reason why I am not running Linux right now = Use of terminal: as long as linux will require use of the terminal for every effing advanced tweakage or problem resolution I will not use Linux. It's as simple as that. If you can manage whitout jumping into the registy and DOS on Windows, you should be able to manage without the terminal in Linux Os'. Anyway my 2 cents....
Submitted by Anonymous (not registered) on Wed, 2009-01-14 03:35.
Reread the How-To.  The Linux distribution included a Graphical User Interface installer--it just did not work for this particular application (As I wrote this, MicroSoft popped up an announcement that I needed to install fixes for its latest bugs.).  Anyone unwilling to tackle the Registry and command line in Windows is hardly capable of "advanced tweakage or problem resolution."
Submitted by Anonymous (not registered) on Tue, 2008-12-02 00:22.
Actually, the How To ads 3 steps to avoid the GUI which is odd. If, in the first step, they had simply opened it with the GDebi Package Installer, they could have installed it graphically.
Submitted by admin (registered user) on Tue, 2008-12-02 00:54.

GDebi did not work for me:

"The Open with GDebi Package Installer (default) option does not work here for some strange reason, it gives back an error. "

Submitted by marcus0263 (registered user) on Sun, 2008-11-30 21:27.

If you're "refuse" to run Linux then why are you trolling through Linux boards?

Really these Fanboy's make for really annoying trolls you know 

Submitted by Anonymous (not registered) on Sat, 2008-11-29 20:05.
You really don't understand do you. Unix shell is the best thing we got in terms of interfacing with our computers. It's extremely fast and extremely powerfull. The reason why you should want to run Linux is to make advantage of that.
Submitted by Scott Carlson (not registered) on Sat, 2008-11-29 19:02.

You don't need to use the command line.  To install the downloaded deb from the GUI.  Go to Places -> Desktop.  Right click on the downloaded deb package and choose  "Open with GDebi Package Installer"

For people that have been using an OS for a long time, they sometimes use what they first learned.  That is very common.  That's why I still use a command line for most things when I am forced to use Windows.  

So I don't think it is fair to criticize a person who put their free time into creating a free howto.  Next time, you could ask "is there a way to do this without using the command line.  I'm not comfortable with the command line."

Submitted by Mike (not registered) on Sat, 2008-11-29 18:01.

Well in general that's Unix for you. Remember, Unix was never designed as a desktop operating system. So far the only people out there who have managed to make a true user-friendly Unix derivative are Apple. So if you want to run Unix, but don't want to deal with the command line, run OS X.

 

Submitted by Anonymous (not registered) on Sat, 2008-11-29 17:53.
Please, you don't have to use the command line very much in modern Linux Desktops. I still use the command line in Windows now and then.   You don't even need crossover office to run windows apps, you just need WINE.  In ubuntu 8.10 you can use the GUI package manager to install everything.  You only use the command line if you want to.
Submitted by Anonymous (not registered) on Sat, 2008-11-29 16:47.

The use of the terminal is not required. However, as you saw, this article chose to use three lines to do the work of 20 clicks. But, if you don't want to copy and paste the three lines of commands simply start clicking.

 The biggest joke of all is that while people like you complain about Linux and the command line, Microsoft is hard at work adding command shells to Windows.

Windows Vista and Server 2008 have countless command line tools added including Windows Power Shell. The upcoming Windows 7 will also have a lot more reliance on Power Shell. Exchange 2007 is completely non-functional without its own Power Shell.

Submitted by Anonymous (not registered) on Sat, 2008-11-29 16:44.

You don't have to.

Everything done in this tutorial can be done with the mouse, but the terminal is just a far better way of writing tutorials/help guides.

If I tell you what to click on it will be confuzing and if you are running a slightly different system you could get lost.

With the terminal you can just paste in the commands and it will get done.

Maybe you should stop being so damned ignorant, just because it has an extra, more efficient feature, that does not make it any less of an OS

Submitted by Anonymous (not registered) on Sat, 2008-11-29 15:25.

Everything could be done without using the terminal. It's the standard way of writing guides, because there are so many window managers and stuff like that. Making a separate guide for all combinations would waste a lot of time. Just copy pasting those commands to the terminal does not only work for everybody, it's also by far the fastest way of doing it.

Submitted by Anonymous (not registered) on Sat, 2008-11-29 15:23.

Hahahaha....

You just double click on .deb file and will install like in Windowsh.. ( like doubleclick on .exe)  and after r.click on .deb file and "MOVE TO TRASH".Easy !

Submitted by Anonymous (not registered) on Sat, 2008-11-29 14:03.

If Linux offers nothing that Windows or Mac does not besides the "all glorious" Open Source (which frankly is a bit of a joke when you examine how little cohesion the little societies have, forking after the slightest argument and refusing to form standards).

 When Linux gets that "killer app" that's as usable as it is efficient, I'll have probably woken up by then.

Linux is a noble effort but it is by no means ready and will not be until someone steps up who knows how people think and MAKES it usable -- And Linux massocists are content to keep their OS annoying and difficult to use if it drives us "heathens" away.

 No, honestly?
 It is a FANTASTIC server OS. It's rock solid, reliable, efficient, fast, very well supported. Everything you could ever want. Now it's just a case of playing catchup and when the kids take their hands off their spinny hats, off their genitalia and away from their noses and get serious, Linux sill blossom.

The bottom line is that Linux needs to GET serious. 

Submitted by Lucas (not registered) on Thu, 2008-12-25 15:51.
Are you kidding me because last time i checked silver light or whatever Microsoft came up with after ADOBE FLASH PLAYER was NOT a standard by anymeans and actually other OS's so if you want people to CONVERT back to windows or bow down to it then y not make things a little more universal
Submitted by Sterling Dragon (not registered) on Tue, 2008-12-02 06:52.

Quite honestly, this is the perfect demonstration of why the two schools will never cooperate:  On the one hand, you have the Windows fanatics that refuse to put forth any effort to learn how to utilize the true power of Linux.  On the other hand, you have the Linux fanatics that refuse to understand that the vast majority of civilization (led by the 'good ol' US of A) has become so lazy and dependent upon convenience that in order to sell them ANYTHING, you need to make it "automagic" in every conceivable way.

In short, Linux biggest obstacle is that distro developers cannot seem to grasp that any windows user can sit down in front of any windows box, and do what they know how to do; it's consistent.  MS's biggest obstacle is that they are so busy making everything convenient and automated, and being "first to market" that they can never seem to release a finished product, releasing and patching constantly.  Linux patches for greater stability and functionality.  Windows patches because they have to.

I, personally, use both.  I am a junior system administrator under Windows (AD environment), and I am learning Linux by choice.  Linux can do what Windows can't seem to do: release a stable distro, and NOT before it's ready.  Windows excels in what Linux can't seem to grasp: In order to make something widespread, you must (ABSOLUTELY MUST) cater to the lazy.

 Quite frankly, the use of one or the other is a choice.  Open source has produced in great stride, in recent years.  Windows is entrenched.  Mac is not what it used to be.  To the Windows fanboys: If you refuse to use Linux, you are only limiting yourself.  Narrow minds often speak loudly.  To the Linux fanboys: Staunch adherence to dogmatic practices will keep you in the Catholic dark ages.  Either way, it is simply a choice, and neither side will convince the other until both side learn to speak AND listen.

 Good luck to all of you.

 

Sterling Dragon

Submitted by Jesse (not registered) on Sat, 2008-11-29 20:58.
I guarantee you the above was written by someone who used Linux on the desktop for less than 20 minutes, and then only so that he could say "Oh, I've used Linux"
Submitted by Anonymous (not registered) on Sun, 2008-11-30 04:27.
i've used Linux for almost a year, and i still agree with that guy, Windows is ALWAYS ready out of the box, it's so useful, why should i bother with something different anywhere else than in my virtual box
Submitted by Anonymous (not registered) on Sun, 2008-11-30 18:51.

I guess if you torrent one of those customized Windows CDs, it might be ready out of the box. But the basic Windows you can buy from the shop doesn't get even near the functionality of a fresh Linux install. Almost every Linux distribution comes with an office suite, media player, CD/DVD burning software, advanced web-browser, an image-manipulator... not to mention security ;) 

Every time you (re)install Windows, you need to fetch almost 30 excecutables from around the net and install(+reboot) them one at a time...

Submitted by ubuntuser (not registered) on Sat, 2008-11-29 13:56.
Not sure why he invoked the terminal there to install a .deb file.... you can double click it and Gdebi will run and install it for you. Gdebi comes with Ubuntu out of the box. All GUI, no terminal. I guess when someone uses Linux and is used to the terminal they do it that way by default? Ubuntu is my primary OS and I do whatever is handy but it seems to me double clicking it and clicking the install button would be easiest.
Submitted by Linux user (not registered) on Sat, 2008-11-29 13:38.

Wow this must be one of these half positive but mostly negative comments that are designed to off put any enthusiasm that might exist in linux, the fact is that these days you don't need to use the terminal.

Another fact to consider is if you want to use the command line, its a stack load better than anything that come out of Redmond.

Please stop making such silly and useless posts because they're really just obfuscating the truth. the fact is that my 71 year old father and 69 year old mother use linux and benefit from the lack of viruses and faster performance over XP/Vista.

your command line comment was relevant 2-5 years ago, but totally irrelevant today.

I'm a happy Free and Open Source Software user and have been for years.

Submitted by Asim (not registered) on Sat, 2008-11-29 12:15.

In the context of this tutorial one doesn't have to use Terminal; you could just as easily browse to the .DEB file using Nautilus (i.e. the Ubuntu equivalent of Explorer/Finder) and double click on the file.

Submitted by Anonymous (not registered) on Sat, 2008-11-29 12:06.

True, but then for advanced configuration in windows XP I have to open C:windowssystem32, right click gpedit, click run as, enter the admin password, track down the Internet Explorer settings and then set the proxy settings up so they're global and unchangeable. Oops, but then there's a problem because Windows Update doesn't use those proxy settings so I have to open a command prompt and run "proxycfg -p 192.168.2.1:3128". Then of course I have to add the same settings to McAfee because the proxycfg confuses it.

All this to do something I can do by executing

http_proxy="192.168.2.1:3128

export http_proxy

in a terminal on Linux.  As you say, going to a terminal is a pain but GPedit and the convoluted cryptic mess that is Regedit don't make "Advanced" configuration on Windows any simpler really, assuming you know what you're doing.

Submitted by DaveC (not registered) on Sat, 2008-11-29 11:48.
hmmmm......I don't see where the terminal is used in this tutorial.......infact us generally don't have to use the terminal anymore in linux, although, most people do turn to linux because using the command line is just much more powerful, and it is a much more versatile command line in linux, but if you want to be a panzy, there really is no need to use it, especially on ubuntu
Submitted by Anonymous (not registered) on Sat, 2008-11-29 11:39.
You don't have to use the terminal. In this tutorial you can just click it and gdebi on gnome will install the package. Then you can just delete it like any other file. There is no point in you saying something like that when this site is not for the super new user that isn't willing to do anything but click a mouse.
Submitted by Jammy Jojo (not registered) on Sat, 2008-11-29 05:18.

Yeah, I'd say you hit the nail right on the head!

www.anonymize.us.tc 

Submitted by Anonymous (not registered) on Fri, 2008-11-28 14:20.

I have was one of the lucky ones and got crossover linux and also the crossover games for free. I have install office 2007 and it works perfectly. I have also installed Guuildwars with the cross over gaming and it is perfect, except the load times are alittle longer. I have nothing bad to say about this product and had I know about it earlier I would have paid for it. Now that I know about it I think I will be buying this product as it updates. Just want to let everyone know that this is probley my favorite app for linux thus far.

 

 

Submitted by Anonymous (not registered) on Sat, 2008-11-29 09:43.
Seriously? The best app you have found so far is an app that allows you to use Windows software? You are really looking hard then! I am not an avid Linux user by any means but if the best thing you can find is an app to run Windows apps then you should just quit...
Submitted by mentr (not registered) on Sat, 2008-11-29 17:26.

As long certain companies like adobe,  microsoft, gaming studios etc. - with software used by specific groups (designers, office, gamers)  - don't feel like making there software useable out-of-the-box for linux then there will always be a need for software like wine/crossover.

It's the companies above that don't want to get a linux workforce ($$$) to do the job... so 3rd party software developers (wine/crossover) make a workaround for it.

Submitted by Anonymous (not registered) on Sat, 2008-11-29 07:59.
You have was?
Submitted by Anonymous (not registered) on Sat, 2008-11-29 05:52.

I also have installed office 2007 on the latest version of crossover for linux, but it is far from stable. It certainly doesn't work "perfectly" in fact many things don't work (outlook) and when they do they crash regularly (word) Wine is nice for some things, it usually supports software that is older quite well, but it's not something you want to trust anything you don't want to lose to.

Submitted by Anonymous (not registered) on Sat, 2008-11-29 18:52.
Why do people even bother running Microsoft apps?  Open Office works just fine.  Or just use Google's online apps. Microsoft will be pushing more applications into the cloud soon enough  (Live mesh, Azure, etc..)  Not to slam crossover, but if you need Windows emulation then why not run the free version on vmware server for Linux or Sun's Virtual Box which run pretty darn well and will handle just about anything that Microsoft has written.
Submitted by Mr_D (not registered) on Mon, 2010-06-07 21:00.

Many company's and Government use Microsoft and forces you to use it also if you want your documents to be read by them.

I already use open office for my personal use.

In addition as in my phone, I use a magic jack and love it , but it only works on ms xp.

I have 1 desktop I have already switched to Mint and love it so far, as for changing all of my laptops and such until I can find apps to run my magic jack and blackberry desktop and at least one to use ms office, I will have to either run Windoz or use an emulator, which if anyone wants to email me and advise on them and I can get everything I have working I will gladly switch everything.

BTY all the drivers loaded on the desktop and worked with No command line use :)

Now if it will be as easy on 3 older laptops lol (hoping ) 

Mint 8 user on an old amd xp2800 homebuilt 

Submitted by fares (not registered) on Sun, 2011-07-31 11:20.
dpkg: error processing crossover-pro_7.1.0-1_i386.deb (--install): cannot access archive: No such file or directory Errors were encountered while processing: crossover-pro_7.1.0-1_i386.deb I tryed permissions... doing that as root.. i even read the whole man out of it.. anyideas?