Network Reconfig. w. ISPConfig 3.0.4

Discussion in 'Installation/Configuration' started by midcarolina, Nov 9, 2011.

  1. midcarolina

    midcarolina New Member

    Hi,
    I wasn't sure what category to put this under, so I went with ISPConfig to get the proper set-up instructions. This is what I am trying to do. I have a new Linux server set-up with a single public ip, netmask, gateway, etc. all configured already. I know now that this is going to cause bad load balancing issues soon so I have purchased a combination load balancer / port forwarding router to prevent this. When setting it up, I made adjustments to system-config-network, set up the LAN ip 192.168.x.xx as the first IP. I would like a step-by-step guide (please) to set this up without wrecking ISPConfig 3.0.4. My plan was to then create multiple static ips like my first box is now using:
    eth0
    eth0:0
    eth0:1 etc., etc,

    I also want to know (because I have this option) if I should add an additional ethernet card as eth1 and put the load balancer / router on this. I have seen that this can be done, but NOT in relation to ISPConfig, which is the deciding factor, as this is the CPanel I will be using. (already set-up flawlessly)

    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. CSsab

    CSsab New Member

    Hi - not sure if this will help since my setup is different to yours but this is what I do:

    Configure the main server with the static IP (as you have already done so far as I can tell)

    your network interfaces would look something like this:

    # This file describes the network interfaces available on your system
    # and how to activate them. For more information, see interfaces(5).

    # The loopback network interface
    auto lo
    iface lo inet loopback

    # The primary network interface
    auto eth0
    iface eth0 inet static
    address 192.168.1.
    200
    netmask 255.255.255.0
    network 192.168.1.0
    broadcast 192.168.1.255
    gateway 192.168.1.1


    install bridge-utils

    edit your "interfaces" file to look something like this:

    # This file describes the network interfaces available on your system
    # and how to activate them. For more information, see interfaces(5).

    # The loopback network interface
    auto lo
    iface lo inet loopback

    # The primary network interface
    # auto eth0
    # iface eth0 inet dhcp

    # br0
    auto br0
    iface br0 inet static
    address 192.168.1.200
    netmask 255.255.255.0
    network 192.168.1.0
    broadcast 192.168.1.255
    gateway 192.168.1.1
    bridge_ports eth0
    bridge_fd 0
    bridge_maxwait 0
    bridge_stp off
    post-up /usr/sbin/brctl setfd br0 0

    Then your new servers (or virtual machines) can all be configured with their own eth0 interfaces and be able to talk to each other.


    OR set a few bridges up to isolate services and domain names (I don't have this setup at the moment but have used it before):


    # br0
    auto br0
    iface br0 inet static
    address 192.168.1.200
    netmask 255.255.255.0
    network 192.168.1.0
    broadcast 192.168.1.255
    gateway 192.168.1.1
    bridge_ports eth0
    bridge_fd 0
    bridge_maxwait 0
    bridge_stp off
    post-up /usr/sbin/brctl setfd br0 0

    # br1
    auto br0
    iface br0 inet static
    address 192.168.1.201
    netmask 255.255.255.0
    network 192.168.1.0
    broadcast 192.168.1.255
    gateway 192.168.1.1
    bridge_ports eth0 (or bridge to an eth1 interfaces)
    bridge_fd 0
    bridge_maxwait 0
    bridge_stp off
    post-up /usr/sbin/brctl setfd br1 0


    As you can see there are quite a few ways to set up networking.
    Good luck
     

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