Virtualization

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OpenVZ On Debian Etch For Webservers

OpenVZ On Debian Etch For Webservers

Virtualization is nice! A good practice for servers, since it makes things more secure, scalable, replacable, and replicable. All this at the cost of little added complexity. This guide is written during an install of a Supermicro machine with 2 dual-core opterons (64-bit), 2 identical disks (for RAID) and a load of memory. Why OpenVZ and not XEN or the recent KVM kernel module? Well, XEN is not very stable for 64-bit architectures (yet), and it comes with quite a bit of overhead (every VM runs its own kernel) due to its complexity. KVM is very simple but restricts you to run a kernel as one process, so the VM cannot benefit from multi core systems.

How To Install Slackware 11 In VMware On Windows XP

How To Install Slackware 11 In VMware On Windows XP

Slackware 11 is out! All slackware users must be anxious to see this long waited version (Yes, I am a slacker ^^). To feel the new Slackware, I decided to install it in VMware on a laptop.

Running Windows on the Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud with Qemu and Linux

Running Windows on the Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud with Qemu and Linux

This tutorial explains how to set up and run Windows on the Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud Beta with the help of Qemu and Linux. This HOWTO can be adapted to install any guest operating system supported by QEMU. We have chosen Windows Server 2003 because they offer a free evaluation copy, but QEMU can be used for emulating other operating systems - including, Solaris, *BSD, Unix, etc.

Linux-Vserver on Debian Testing (Etch), the easy way

Linux-Vserver on Debian Testing (Etch), the easy way 

In this tutorial, I'll show you how to install Linux-Vserver on Debian Testing (Etch). Basically, Linux-Vserver is an open-source system used to separate a single physical server into multiple virtual servers. From the Linux-Vserver website: "Linux-VServer allows you to create virtual private servers and security contexts which operate like a normal Linux server, but allow many independent servers to be run simultaneously in one box at full speed."

Install Slackware 11.0 in a VMware ESX Server 2.5.x VM

Install Slackware 11.0 in a VMware ESX Server 2.5.x VM

This guide will help you install Slackware in a safe VMware virtual environment, with its own unique quirks to take care off. Slackware is not officially supported on VMware, but it can be installed without too many problems, once you got past choosing 'scsi.s' and '/dev/sda', in the beginning and remember to install lilo on the MBR.

VMWare and Xen Management with BixData

VMWare and Xen Management with BixData

BixData is a system, application, and network monitoring tool which allows you to easily monitor nearly every aspect of your servers. The newly released version 2.6 is the only application that has the ability to control both Xen and VMWare virtual machines. You can control both VM Hosts (the computer that's running the VM software) and VM Guests (the virtual machines running on the hosts).

The Perfect Setup - OpenVZ with CentOS 4.4

The Perfect Setup - OpenVZ with CentOS 4.4

In this HowTo I will describe how to prepare a CentOS 4.4 server for OpenVZ virtual machines. With OpenVZ you can create multiple Virtual Private Servers (VPS) on the same hardware, similar to Xen and the Linux Vserver project. OpenVZ is the open-source branch of Virtuozzo, a commercial virtualization solution used by many providers that offer virtual servers.

Managing Xen With Xen-Tools, Xen-Shell, And Argo

Managing Xen With Xen-Tools, Xen-Shell, And Argo

This guide describes how to install and use xen-tools, xen-shell, and Argo on a Debian system. All three packages provide useful tools for the administration of virtual Xen machines. Xen-tools is a collection of Perl scripts that allow you to easily create, update, and delete Xen guest domains. The xen-shell provides a command-line interface to owners of Xen domains so that they can manage their Xen domains without the help of the server administrator. And with Argo, you can control Xen domains through a web interface or through a menu on the command line. All three packages were developed for Debian systems, but might work on other distributions as well.

The Perfect Xen 3.0.3 Setup For Debian Sarge

The Perfect Xen 3.0.3 Setup For Debian Sarge

This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen (version 3.0.3) on a Debian Sarge (3.1) system.

Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other (e.g. a virtual machine for a mail server, a virtual machine for a high-traffic web site, another virtual machine that serves your customers' web sites, a virtual machine for DNS, etc.), but still use the same hardware. This saves money, and what is even more important, it's more secure. If the virtual machine of your DNS server gets hacked, it has no effect on your other virtual machines. Plus, you can move virtual machines from one Xen server to the next one.

How To Install VMware Server On Debian Sarge

How To Install VMware Server On Debian Sarge

This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install the free VMware Server (version 1.0.1) on a Debian Sarge system. VMware has just released version 1.0 of its free VMware Server. With VMware Server you can create and run guest operating systems ("virtual machines") such as Linux, Windows, FreeBSD, etc. under a host operating system. This has the benefit that you can run multiple operating systems on the same hardware which saves a lot of money, and you can move virtual machines from one VMware Server to the next one (or to a system that has the VMware Player which is also free). In this article we use Debian Sarge (3.1) as the host operating system.

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