Xen

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Installing Xen On An Ubuntu Feisty Fawn Server From The Ubuntu Repositories

Installing Xen On An Ubuntu Feisty Fawn Server From The Ubuntu Repositories

This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen on an Ubuntu Feisty Fawn (Ubuntu 7.04) server system (i386). You can find all the software used here in the Ubuntu repositories, so no external files or compilation are needed. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0).

Installing Xen On CentOS 5.0 (i386)

Installing Xen On CentOS 5.0 (i386)

This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen (version 3.0.3) on a CentOS 5.0 system (i386). Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other (e.g. a virtual machine for a mail server, a virtual machine for a high-traffic web site, another virtual machine that serves your customers' web sites, a virtual machine for DNS, etc.), but still use the same hardware.

The Perfect Xen 3.1.0 Setup For Debian Etch (i386)

The Perfect Xen 3.1.0 Setup For Debian Etch (i386)

This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen (version 3.1.0) on a Debian Etch (4.0) system (i386). Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other (e.g. a virtual machine for a mail server, a virtual machine for a high-traffic web site, another virtual machine that serves your customers' web sites, a virtual machine for DNS, etc.), but still use the same hardware.

Debian Etch And Xen From The Debian Repository

Debian Etch And Xen From The Debian Repository

This how-to provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen on an already working Debian Etch system. You can find all the software used here in the Etch repository, so no external files or compilation are needed.

Using XenExpress To Virtualize Your Server

Using XenExpress To Virtualize Your Server

This Howto covers the installation of XenExpress and the creation of virtual machines with the XenServer Administrator Console. XenExpress is the free virtualization platform from XenSource, the company behind the well known Xen virtualization engine. XenExpress makes it easy to create, run and manage Xen virtual machines with the XenServer Administrator Console. XenExpress can run up to 4 virtual machines at the same time with a max. total amount of 4GB RAM. The XenExpress installation CD contains a full Linux distribution which is customized to run XenExpress.

VMWare and Xen Management with BixData

VMWare and Xen Management with BixData

BixData is a system, application, and network monitoring tool which allows you to easily monitor nearly every aspect of your servers. The newly released version 2.6 is the only application that has the ability to control both Xen and VMWare virtual machines. You can control both VM Hosts (the computer that's running the VM software) and VM Guests (the virtual machines running on the hosts).

Managing Xen With Xen-Tools, Xen-Shell, And Argo

Managing Xen With Xen-Tools, Xen-Shell, And Argo

This guide describes how to install and use xen-tools, xen-shell, and Argo on a Debian system. All three packages provide useful tools for the administration of virtual Xen machines. Xen-tools is a collection of Perl scripts that allow you to easily create, update, and delete Xen guest domains. The xen-shell provides a command-line interface to owners of Xen domains so that they can manage their Xen domains without the help of the server administrator. And with Argo, you can control Xen domains through a web interface or through a menu on the command line. All three packages were developed for Debian systems, but might work on other distributions as well.

The Perfect Xen 3.0.3 Setup For Debian Sarge

The Perfect Xen 3.0.3 Setup For Debian Sarge

This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen (version 3.0.3) on a Debian Sarge (3.1) system.

Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other (e.g. a virtual machine for a mail server, a virtual machine for a high-traffic web site, another virtual machine that serves your customers' web sites, a virtual machine for DNS, etc.), but still use the same hardware. This saves money, and what is even more important, it's more secure. If the virtual machine of your DNS server gets hacked, it has no effect on your other virtual machines. Plus, you can move virtual machines from one Xen server to the next one.

How To Set Up Xen 3.0 From Binaries In Ubuntu 6.06 LTS (Dapper Drake)

How To Set Up Xen 3.0 From Binaries In Ubuntu 6.06 LTS (Dapper Drake)

This tutorial contains step-by-step instructions for installing Xen 3.0 from precompiled binaries in Ubuntu Dapper Drake.

The Perfect Xen 3.0.1 Setup For Debian

The Perfect Xen 3.0.1 Setup For Debian

This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen (version 3.0.1) on a Debian Sarge (3.1) system.

Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other (e.g. a virtual machine for a mail server, a virtual machine for a high-traffic web site, another virtual machine that serves your customers' web sites, a virtual machine for DNS, etc.), but still use the same hardware. This saves money, and what is even more important, it's more secure. If the virtual machine of your DNS server gets hacked, it has no effect on your other virtual machines. Plus, you can move virtual machines from one Xen server to the next one.

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