Backup

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Creating Snapshot-Backups with FlyBack On Ubuntu 7.10

Creating Snapshot-Backups with FlyBack On Ubuntu 7.10

FlyBack is a tool similar to Apple's TimeMachine. It is intended to create snapshot-backups of selected directories or even your full hard drive. From the FlyBack project page: "FlyBack is a snapshot-based backup tool based on rsync. It creates successive backup directories mirroring the files you wish to backup, but hard-links unchanged files to the previous backup. This prevents wasting disk space while providing you with full access to all your files without any sort of recovery program. If your machine crashes, just move your external drive to your new machine and copy the latest backup using whatever file browser you normally use." This article shows how to install and use FlyBack on Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon).

RESTORE-DC (Data Center) User Manual

RESTORE-DC User Manual

This manual is part reference and part tutorial, meaning that you can look to it for everything from the simple questions of , “What does this icon do?” to the more involved questions, like “How do I schedule e-mail notifications?” Your experience with Restore will depend on your privileges on the Restore system. The administrator for the system will have a few extra capabilities that a standard user will not.

Creating Snapshot Backups Of Your Desktop With Timevault On Ubuntu 7.10

Creating Snapshot Backups Of Your Desktop With Timevault On Ubuntu 7.10

This document describes how to set up, configure and use Timevault on Ubuntu 7.10. The resulting system provides a powerful backup system for desktop usage. TimeVault is a simple front-end for making snapshots of a set of directories. Snapshots are a copy of a directory structure or file at a certain point in time. Restore functionality is integrated into Nautilus - previous versions of a file or directory that has a snapshot can be accessed by examining the properties and selecting the 'Previous Versions' tab.

Creating Encrypted FTP Backups With duplicity And ftplicity On Debian Etch

Creating Encrypted FTP Backups With duplicity And ftplicity On Debian Etch

When you rent a dedicated server nowadays, almost all providers give you FTP backup space for your server on one of the provider's backup systems. This tutorial shows how you can use duplicity and ftplicity to create encrypted (so that nobody with access to the backup server can read sensitive data in your backups) backups on the provider's remote backup server over FTP. ftplicity is a duplicity wrapper script (provided by the German computer magazine c't) that allows us to use duplicity without interaction (i.e., you do not have to type in any passwords).

Back Up Your Files With Pybackpack On Fedora 8

Back Up Your Files With Pybackpack On Fedora 8

This document describes how to set up, configure and use Pybackpack on Fedora 8. The result is an easy to use backup system for desktop usage. Pybackpack creates incremental backups which can be stored locally or remotely (SSH) - the usage of removable devices is supported. You have also the option to burn the backup(s) directly on a CD/DVD.

Installing FOG Computer Imaging Solution On Fedora 8

Installing FOG Computer Imaging Solution On Fedora 8

This tutorial will show how to install FOG, a free computer imaging solution on Fedora 8. FOG is an open source replacement for products like Ghost or Zenworks Imaging. FOG can be used to image Windows XP and Vista machines that have a single partition on them. FOG does not use boot disks, instead everything is done via PXE and DHCP. The management of FOG is all done via a web portal. FOG also includes things like memtest, disk wiping, low-level disk checking and file recovery. FOG also includes a service that will do things like change the computer's hostname after imaging, etc.

Disk Based Backups With Amanda On Debian Etch

Disk Based Backups With Amanda On Debian Etch

This document describes how to set up Amanda (The Advanced Maryland Automatic Network Disk Archiver) on Debian Etch. For this tutorial I chose Ubuntu v7.04 as a backup-client. The resulting system provides a flexible backup-system with many features. It will be able to back up multiple hosts via network to various devices. I chose the disk based backup for this howto.

Use SSHFS With rdiff-backup.

Use SSHFS With rdiff-backup

An excellent tool to create backups is rdiff-backup. It is based on SSH, and the feature of SSH to execute a command on a remote system, as long as you can log in to this machine with SSH. Now I've been experimenting with SSHFS, and one of the things it can be used for is rdiff-Backup. Sshfs is a FUSE module, which allows you to mount the remote system.

How To Back Up MySQL Databases Without Interrupting MySQL

How To Back Up MySQL Databases Without Interrupting MySQL

This article describes how you can back up MySQL databases without interrupting the MySQL service. Normally, when you want to create a MySQL backup, you either have to stop MySQL or issue a read lock on your MySQL tables in order to get a correct backup; if you don't do it this way, you can end up with an inconsistent backup. To get consistent backups without interrupting MySQL, I use a little trick: I replicate my MySQL database to a second MySQL server, and on the second MySQL server I use a cron job that creates regular backups of the replicated database.

Creating a dd/dcfldd Image Using Automated Image & Restore (AIR)

Creating a dd/dcfldd Image Using Automated Image & Restore (AIR)

Automated Image & Restore (AIR) is an open source application that provides a GUI front end to the dd/dcfldd (Dataset Definition (dd)) command. AIR is designed to easily create forensic disk/partition images. It supports MD5/SHAx hashes, SCSI tape drives, imaging over a TCP/IP network, splitting images, and detailed session logging. To date, the AIR utility has only been developed for use on Linux distributions. In its simplest form, AIR provides a convenient interface to execute the dd set of commands. It eliminates the risk of "fat fingering" an error in the shell terminal and ultimately makes using the dd command more user-friendly for those who are not as experienced. Please note that using the AIR front end still requires some basic knowledge of how the dd (or dcfldd) commands work.

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