Apache

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Merging Multiple Apache Access Logs Into One Overall Access Log

Merging Multiple Apache Access Logs Into One Overall Access Log

Let's assume you have a web application that runs of a cluster of Apache nodes. Each node generates its own Apache access log from which you can generate page view statistics with tools such as Webalizer or AWStats. Obviously you do not want to have page view statistics for each Apache node, but overall page view statistics. To achieve this, we must merge the access logs from each node into one overall access log that we can then feed into Webalizer or AWstats. There is a Perl script called logresolvemerge.pl (part of the AWStats package) that can do this for us.

Have Your Own (Chrooted) Debian LAMP Server While Running The Perfect Ubuntu Desktop

Have Your Own (Chrooted) Debian LAMP Server While Running The Perfect Ubuntu Desktop

This is a brief description about the steps to be taken to setup a Debian based Webserver (Debian Sarge alias Debian 3.1) that will run chrooted under Ubuntu 7.04.

PHP Access To An MSSQL Database From Debian Etch With ODBC And FreeTDS

PHP Access To An MSSQL Database From Debian Etch With ODBC And FreeTDS

This assumes you already have Apache2 and PHP5 set up properly on your system. My efforts to get this connection working were compiled from information found at www.unixodbc.org and www.freetds.org. These steps worked for me with an Apache2 web server with php5 running on Debian Etch stable in October of 2007. The SQL server is running Microsoft SQL 2005 on a Windows 2003 Server OS.

Defining Macros With mod_macro In Apache

Defining Macros With mod_macro In Apache

This guide is about mod_macro, which makes the job of managing an Apache webserver much easier, or just for the home developer with several test pages or projects. I will explain how to get it running and give some examples of how I use the module, to help you get started with using it.

How To Tell Apache To Not Log Certain Requests In Its Access Log

How To Tell Apache To Not Log Certain Requests In Its Access Log

Normally Apache logs all requests in its access log. In certain cases this can distort your page view statistics (if you use a tool like Webalizer or AWStats that creates statistics based on Apache's access log), for example if you get lots of visits from search engine spiders or from a certain IP address (e.g. your own), or if each of your pages includes another page (e.g. in an iframe) from your web site (that would instantly double your page views which is obviously not correct). This short guide shows how you use Apache's SetEnvIf directive to prevent Apache from logging such requests.

Installing ModSecurity2 On Debian Etch

Installing ModSecurity2 On Debian Etch

This article shows how to install and configure ModSecurity (version 2) for use with Apache2 on a Debian Etch system. ModSecurity is an Apache module that provides intrusion detection and prevention for web applications. It aims at shielding web applications from known and unknown attacks, such as SQL injection attacks, cross-site scripting, path traversal attacks, etc.

Setting Up A Subversion Repository Using Apache, With Auto Updatable Working Copy

Setting Up A Subversion Repository Using Apache, With Auto Updatable Working Copy

Subversion is a free/open-source version control system. That is, Subversion manages files and directories over time. A tree of files is placed into a central repository. The repository is much like an ordinary file server, except that it remembers every change ever made to your files and directories. This allows you to recover older versions of your data, or examine the history of how your data changed. In this regard, many people think of a version control system as a sort of “time machine”.

Splitting Apache Logs With vlogger

Splitting Apache Logs With vlogger

Vlogger is a little tool with which you can write Apache logs broken down by virtual hosts and days. With vlogger, we need to put just one CustomLog directive into our global Apache configuration, and it will write access logs for each virtual host and day. Therefore, you do not have to split Apache's overall access log into access logs for each virtual host each day, and you do not have to configure Apache to write one access log per virtual host (which could make you run out of file descriptors very fast).

Introducing Remo - An Easy Way to Secure an Insecure Online Application with ModSecurity

Introducing Remo - An Easy Way to Secure an Insecure Online Application with ModSecurity

Say you have a nasty application on your Apache webserver that has been installed by some jerks from the marketing department and you can neither remove nor patch it. Maybe it is a time problem, a lack of know-how, a lack of source-code, or possibly even political reasons. Consequently you need to protect it without touching it. There is ModSecurity, but they say this is only for experts. A straightforward alternative is Remo, a graphical rule editor for ModSecurity that comes with a whitelist approach. It has all you need to lock down the application.

Apache: Creating A Session-Aware Loadbalancer Using mod_proxy_balancer (Debian Etch)

Apache: Creating A Session-Aware Loadbalancer Using mod_proxy_balancer (Debian Etch)

Since Apache 2.1, a new module called mod_proxy_balancer is available which lets you turn a system that has Apache installed into a loadbalancer. This loadbalancer retrieves requested pages from two or more backend webservers and delivers them to the user's computer. Users get the impression that they deal with just one server (the loadbalancer) when in fact there are multiple systems behind the loadbalancer that process the users' requests. By using a loadbalancer, you can lower the load average on your webservers. One important feature of mod_proxy_balancer is that it can keep track of sessions which means that a single user always deals with the same backend webserver. Most websites are database-driven nowadays with user logins etc., and you'd get weird results if a user logs in on one backend webserver, and then his next request goes to another backend webserver, meaning he'd get logged out again. You can avoid this by using mod_proxy_balancer's session-awareness.

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