Virtualization

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How To Convert Physical Systems And Xen VMs Into OpenVZ Containers (Debian Etch)

How To Convert Physical Systems And Xen VMs Into OpenVZ Containers (Debian Etch)

This guide explains how you can convert physical systems (running Debian Etch) or Xen domUs (also running Debian Etch) into an OpenVZ container. This procedure should also work for converting VMware VMs, VirtualBox VMs, or KVM VMs into OpenVZ containers, but I haven't tried this. It should work for other Linux distributions as well, with minor modifications (for example, the network configuration is not located in /etc/network/interfaces if you're not on Debian/Ubuntu).

Using Xen With LVM-Based VMs Instead Of Image-Based VMs (Debian Etch)

Using Xen With LVM-Based VMs Instead Of Image-Based VMs (Debian Etch)

This guide explains how you can set up LVM-based virtual machines on a Xen host running on Debian Etch instead of virtual machines that use disk images. Virtual machines that use disk images are very slow and heavy on disk IO.

Creating Virtual Machines For Xen, KVM, VMware Workstation 6, and VMware Server With vmbuilder On Ubuntu 8.10

Creating Virtual Machines For Xen, KVM, VMware Workstation 6, and VMware Server With vmbuilder On Ubuntu 8.10

vmbuilder is a tool (introduced on Ubuntu 8.10) that allows you to build virtual machines (with Ubuntu as the OS) for multiple virtualization techniques. Currently it supports Xen, KVM, VMware Workstation 6, and VMware Server. You can afterwards copy the virtual machines to another system (a Xen, KVM, VMware Workstation 6, or VMware Server host) and run them there.

Virtualization With KVM On Ubuntu 8.10

Virtualization With KVM On Ubuntu 8.10

This guide explains how you can install and use KVM for creating and running virtual machines on an Ubuntu 8.10 server. I will show how to create image-based virtual machines and also virtual machines that use a logical volume (LVM). KVM is short for Kernel-based Virtual Machine and makes use of hardware virtualization, i.e., you need a CPU that supports hardware virtualization, e.g. Intel VT or AMD-V.

Installing VirtualBox 2.0 On An Ubuntu 8.10 Desktop

Installing VirtualBox 2.0 On An Ubuntu 8.10 Desktop

This tutorial shows how you can install Sun xVM VirtualBox on an Ubuntu 8.10 desktop. With VirtualBox you can create and run guest operating systems ("virtual machines") such as Linux and Windows under a host operating system. There are two ways of installing VirtualBox: from precompiled binaries that are available for some distributions and come under the PUEL license, and from the sources that are released under the GPL. This article will show how to set up VirtualBox 2.0 from the precompiled binaries.

Installing VirtualBox 2.0 On Mandriva 2009.0

Installing VirtualBox 2.0 On Mandriva 2009.0

This tutorial shows how you can install Sun xVM VirtualBox on a Mandriva 2009.0 desktop. With VirtualBox you can create and run guest operating systems ("virtual machines") such as Linux and Windows under a host operating system. There are two ways of installing VirtualBox: from precompiled binaries that are available for some distributions and come under the PUEL license, and from the sources that are released under the GPL. This article will show how to set up VirtualBox 2.0 from the precompiled binaries.

Managing OpenVZ With The Vtonf Control Panel On CentOS 5.2

Managing OpenVZ With The Vtonf Control Panel On CentOS 5.2

Vtonf is a free web-based control panel (released under the GPL license) for managing virtual private servers (VPS) based on OpenVZ. It makes it very easy to create and manage OpenVZ VMs even for people with little technical knowledge. Right now, Vtonf is available only for RedHat, Fedora, and CentOS (support for Debian is planned), therefore I describe its installation and usage on a CentOS 5.2 server.

How To Install VMware Server 2 On Ubuntu 8.10

How To Install VMware Server 2 On Ubuntu 8.10

This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install VMware Server 2 on an Ubuntu 8.10 desktop system. With VMware Server you can create and run guest operating systems ("virtual machines") such as Linux, Windows, FreeBSD, etc. under a host operating system. This has the benefit that you can run multiple operating systems on the same hardware which saves a lot of money, and you can move virtual machines from one VMware Server to the next one (or to a system that has the VMware Player which is also free).

Clone/Back Up/Restore OpenVZ VMs With vzdump

Clone/Back Up/Restore OpenVZ VMs With vzdump

vzdump is a backup and restore utility for OpenVZ VMs. This tutorial shows how you can use it to clone/back up/restore virtual machines with vzdump.

VBoxHeadless - Running Virtual Machines With VirtualBox 2.0 On A Headless CentOS 5.2 Server

VBoxHeadless - Running Virtual Machines With VirtualBox 2.0 On A Headless CentOS 5.2 Server

This guide explains how you can run virtual machines with Sun xVM VirtualBox 2.0 on a headless CentOS 5.2 server. Normally you use the VirtualBox GUI to manage your virtual machines, but a server does not have a desktop environment. Fortunately, VirtualBox comes with a tool called VBoxHeadless that allows you to connect to the virtual machines over a remote desktop connection, so there's no need for the VirtualBox GUI.

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