Xen

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How To Set Up Xen 4.3 On Debian Wheezy (7.0.2) And Then Upgrade To Jessie

How To Set Up Xen 4.3 On Debian Wheezy (7.0.2) And Then Upgrade To Jessie

This will be a quick and easy setup of XEN(dom0-hypervisor) and one virtual system (domU-guest). I wanted to test out XEN as my second experience after VMware and since many web pages are outdated and have many old fixed bugs and errors. I have decided to give it a spin with XEN.

Xen On Debian Wheezy With LVM

Xen On Debian Wheezy With LVM

With virtualization, you can use one big server to host lots of little servers. It's almost like having your own cloud! This tutorial covers installing Xen and your first virtual machine on top of Debian Wheezy.

Virtualization With Xen On CentOS 6.3 (x86_64) (Paravirtualization & Hardware Virtualization)

Virtualization With Xen On CentOS 6.3 (x86_64) (Paravirtualization & Hardware Virtualization)

This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen (version 4.1.x) on a CentOS 6.3 (x86_64) system. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other.

Virtualization With Xen On CentOS 6.2 (x86_64) (Paravirtualization & Hardware Virtualization)

Virtualization With Xen On CentOS 6.2 (x86_64) (Paravirtualization & Hardware Virtualization)

This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen (version 4.1.2) on a CentOS 6.2 (x86_64) system. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other, but still use the same hardware.

Paravirtualization With Xen On CentOS 5.6 (x86_64)

Paravirtualization With Xen On CentOS 5.6 (x86_64)

This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen (version 3.0.3) on a CentOS 5.6 (x86_64) system. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other (e.g. a virtual machine for a mail server, a virtual machine for a high-traffic web site, another virtual machine that serves your customers' web sites, a virtual machine for DNS, etc.), but still use the same hardware. This saves money, and what is even more important, it's more secure. If the virtual machine of your DNS server gets hacked, it has no effect on your other virtual machines. Plus, you can move virtual machines from one Xen server to the next one.

Paravirtualization With Xen 4.0 On Debian Squeeze (AMD64)

Paravirtualization With Xen 4.0 On Debian Squeeze (AMD64)

This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen 4.0 on a Debian Squeeze (6.0) system (AMD64) and create paravirtualized guests. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other (e.g. a virtual machine for a mail server, a virtual machine for a high-traffic web site, another virtual machine that serves your customers' web sites, a virtual machine for DNS, etc.), but still use the same hardware. This saves money, and what is even more important, it's more secure. If the virtual machine of your DNS server gets hacked, it has no effect on your other virtual machines. Plus, you can move virtual machines from one Xen server to the next one.

Installing Debian Squeeze (6.0) domU On CentOS 5.5 x86_64 dom0

Installing Debian Squeeze (6.0) domU On CentOS 5.5 x86_64 dom0

This tutorial shows how to create a Debian Squeeze (6.0) domU on dom0 running CentOS 5.5 x86_64.

How To Upgrade Debian Lenny (Debian 5.0) To Squeeze (Debian 6.0) On Xen VPS

How To Upgrade Debian Lenny (Debian 5.0) To Squeeze (Debian 6.0) On Xen VPS

This tutorial shows how to upgrade a Debian Lenny (Debian 5.0) installation on a Xen based Virtual Private Server (VPS) to Squeeze (Debian 6.0) including kernel update, dependency based boot sequencing and conversion to UUIDs. If you do it the usual Debian way just with apt-get dist-upgrade you will most likely end up with an unbootable system. This is mainly because the update of grub fails.

Paravirtualization With Xen On CentOS 5.4 (x86_64)

Paravirtualization With Xen On CentOS 5.4 (x86_64)

This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen (version 3.0.3) on a CentOS 5.4 (x86_64) system. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other (e.g. a virtual machine for a mail server, a virtual machine for a high-traffic web site, another virtual machine that serves your customers' web sites, a virtual machine for DNS, etc.), but still use the same hardware. This saves money, and what is even more important, it's more secure. If the virtual machine of your DNS server gets hacked, it has no effect on your other virtual machines. Plus, you can move virtual machines from one Xen server to the next one.

How To Enable Networking In Xen Guests On Hetzner's DS Servers (Debian Etch)

How To Enable Networking In Xen Guests On Hetzner's DS Servers (Debian Etch)

This tutorial shows how you can enable networking in Xen guests (domU) on Hetzner's DS servers. With the DS servers, you can get a subnet of eight additional IPs (or more) - usually that subnet is different from the subnet that the server's main IP is from. The problem is that these additional IPs are bound to the MAC address of the host system (dom0) - Hetzner's routers will dump IP packets if they come from an unknown MAC address. This means we cannot use Xen's bridged mode, but must switch to Xen's routed mode where the host system (dom0) acts as the gateway for the guests.

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