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  #1  
Old 11th August 2006, 19:50
signature16 signature16 is offline
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Default Ubunut the best?

I haven't been able to make the move from Windows to Linux on my desktop. Which distro would it be easiest to make the move on? I hear a lot about unbuntu, but I have never tried it. I liked to write PHP, so I need an application similar to Dreamweaver.


So, which distro has these features?:

1) Really nice looking GUI by default (Gnome/kDE...doesnt matter)
2) Supports wireless without major configuration.

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  #2  
Old 11th August 2006, 20:07
Hans Hans is offline
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Personally, I think for the desktop Ubuntu (GNOME), Kubuntu (KDE) or Xubuntu (Xfce4) is a good choice.

For a server i prefer Debian Sarge.
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  #3  
Old 11th August 2006, 23:28
sjau sjau is offline
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What do you need Dreamweaver for for writing PHP???

As desktop I also recommend Ubuntu... I think it has the best hardware recognition... Fedora Core is also nice but I prefere Ubuntu...
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Old 11th August 2006, 23:33
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I don't really "NEED" Dreamweaver for PHP, it just makes it a lot easier. I was never really satisfied with NVU. I want to put Ubunut on my laptop for school, but I am afraid I won't be able to get the wireless to work.

I had a terrible time trying to get it to work on Gentoo, how easy is it to setup after a basic install of Ubuntu?
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  #5  
Old 12th August 2006, 09:09
sjau sjau is offline
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I didn't have any problems using my wifi pcmcia card with ubuntu... it recognized it straight from the beginning. However it didn't activate and set is as primary (default nic) in the beginning.
On windows I first have to install additional software and drivers to get it work...

If you want to operate a desktop, download the desktop version
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Old 18th August 2006, 11:25
sbovisjb1 sbovisjb1 is offline
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Personally i think Fedora was the best way to go when i first started off, it was fast, not too big and most important, it was reliable.
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Old 24th August 2006, 22:47
ManWithNoName ManWithNoName is offline
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I'm Debian fan, so I will vote for Ubuntu even I hate its rootsudo

An alternative for Nvu is bluefish
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  #8  
Old 27th August 2006, 10:23
thecgmguy thecgmguy is offline
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For a desktop OS, I'd recommend going with Ubuntu. It's got reasonable features, provides great functionality out-of-the-box and is especially designed for new users to the linux platform.

Support is also quite good (for a free OS)

Cheers,

CGM
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  #9  
Old 27th August 2006, 18:07
phubai phubai is offline
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Default Have you looked at PCLinuxOS?

Ubuntu is a fine distro, no doubt, but I find PCLinuxOS very easy to install, has an excellent liveCD, and has excellent support on their forums. I would recommend downloading a couple of distros to see how they work on your system and what the interface looks like before installing. Another excellent distro, and debian based, is MEPIS. Again, they have an excellent liveCD to try before you install. It's all good, and getting better!
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  #10  
Old 5th September 2006, 21:24
ddrager ddrager is offline
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Default

After being away from the desktop linux scene a few years, and hearing a lot of good things about Ubuntu, I thought I would give it a try. After having problems due to a badly burned CD, the install went pretty flawlessly. Wireless worked (on a Thinkpad T23) right out of the box - which is more than I can say for Windows Vista pre-RC.

All of the included packages work great, and synaptics is a great way to install new ones - as long as they are included.

My main critique of Ubuntu, along with all of the other linux desktop systems, is that as soon as you move away from the "comfortable" software packages that are included in the distribution, you quickly need to have advanced linux knowledge. In my mind, this is the same problem we had 5 years ago.

For advanced users, Ubuntu is a great choice and the best from what I can tell of Desktop linux OSes. A lot of the OS has been "Gui-fied" but as soon as there is an issue you revert back to command line and need to have linux knowledge. As long as you are comfortable with that - Ubuntu is a great OS option.
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