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Old 18th May 2007, 11:56
vassilis3 vassilis3 is offline
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MX INFO MX Record Your 1 MX record is:

10 srv.grikservers.com. [TTL=86400] IP=91.xxx.xxx.150 [TTL=86400] [*U]
PASS Low port test OK. Our local DNS server that uses a low port number can get your MX record. Some DNS servers are behind firewalls that block low port numbers. This does not guarantee that your DNS server does not block low ports (this specific lookup must be cached), but is a good indication that it does not.
PASS Invalid characters OK. All of your MX records appear to use valid hostnames, without any invalid characters.
PASS All MX IPs public OK. All of your MX records appear to use public IPs. If there were any private IPs, they would not be reachable, causing slight mail delays, extra resource usage, and possibly bounced mail.
PASS MX records are not CNAMEs OK. Looking up your MX record did not just return a CNAME. If an MX record query returns a CNAME, extra processing is required, and some mail servers may not be able to handle it.
PASS MX A lookups have no CNAMEs OK. There appear to be no CNAMEs returned for A records lookups from your MX records (CNAMEs are prohibited in MX records, according to RFC974, RFC1034 3.6.2, RFC1912 2.4, and RFC2181 10.3).

PASS MX is host name, not IP OK. All of your MX records are host names (as opposed to IP addresses, which are not allowed in MX records).
INFO Multiple MX records NOTE: You only have 1 MX record. If your primary mail server is down or unreachable, there is a chance that mail may have troubles reaching you. In the past, mailservers would usually re-try E-mail for up to 48 hours. But many now only re-try for a couple of hours. If your primary mailserver is very reliable (or can be fixed quickly if it goes down), having just one mailserver may be acceptable.
PASS Differing MX-A records OK. I did not detect differing IPs for your MX records (this would happen if your DNS servers return different IPs than the DNS servers that are authoritative for the hostname in your MX records).
PASS Duplicate MX records OK. You do not have any duplicate MX records (pointing to the same IP). Although technically valid, duplicate MX records can cause a lot of confusion, and waste resources.

PASS Reverse DNS entries for MX records OK. The IPs of all of your mail server(s) have reverse DNS (PTR) entries. RFC1912 2.1 says you should have a reverse DNS for all your mail servers. It is strongly urged that you have them, as many mailservers will not accept mail from mailservers with no reverse DNS entry. Note that this information is cached, so if you changed it recently, it will not be reflected here (see the www.DNSstuff.com Reverse DNS Tool for the current data). The reverse DNS entries are:

150.206.132.91.in-addr.arpa cust-206-150.on2.ontelecoms.gr. [TTL=10768]

Mail PASS Connect to mail servers OK: I was able to connect to all of your mailservers.
PASS Mail server host name in griting OK: All of your mailservers have their host name in the griting:

srv.grikservers.com:
220 srv.grikservers.com ESMTP Postfix (Debian/GNU)
PASS Acceptance of NULL <> sender OK: All of your mailservers accept mail from "<>". You are required (RFC1123 5.2.9) to receive this type of mail (which includes reject/bounce messages and return receipts).
PASS Acceptance of postmaster address OK: All of your mailservers accept mail to postmaster@promos.com (as required by RFC822 6.3, RFC1123 5.2.7, and RFC2821 4.5.1).

PASS Acceptance of abuse address OK: All of your mailservers accept mail to abuse@promos.com.
INFO Acceptance of domain literals WARNING: One or more of your mailservers does not accept mail in the domain literal format (user@[0.0.0.0]). Mailservers are technically required RFC1123 5.2.17 to accept mail to domain literals for any of its IP addresses. Not accepting domain literals can make it more difficult to test your mailserver, and can prevent you from receiving E-mail from people reporting problems with your mailserver. However, it is unlikely that any problems will occur if the domain literals are not accepted (mailservers at many common large domains have this problem).

srv.grikservers.com's postmaster@[91.xxx.xxx.150] response:
>>> RCPT TO:<postmaster@[91.xxx.xxx.150]>
<<< 554 5.7.1 <postmaster@[91.xxx.xxx.150]>: Relay access denied
PASS Open relay test OK: All of your mailservers appear to be closed to relaying. This is not a thorough check, you can get a thorough one here.

srv.grikservers.com OK: 554 5.7.1 <Not.abuse.see.www.DNSreport.com.from.IP.91.xxx.xx x.150@DNSreport.com>: Relay access denied
WARN SPF record Your domain does not have an SPF record. This means that spammers can easily send out E-mail that looks like it came from your domain, which can make your domain look bad (if the recipient thinks you really sent it), and can cost you money (when people complain to you, rather than the spammer). You may want to add an SPF record ASAP, as 01 Oct 2004 was the target date for domains to have SPF records in place (Hotmail, for example, started checking SPF records on 01 Oct 2004).
WWW INFO WWW Record Your www.promos.com A record is:

www.promos.com. A 91.xxx.xxx.150 [TTL=86400] [*U]
PASS All WWW IPs public OK. All of your WWW IPs appear to be public IPs. If there were any private IPs, they would not be reachable, causing problems reaching your web site.
PASS CNAME Lookup OK. Some domains have a CNAME record for their WWW server that requires an extra DNS lookup, which slightly delays the initial access to the website and use extra bandwidth. There are no CNAMEs for www.promos.com, which is good.
INFO Domain A Lookup Your promos.com A record is:

promos.com. A 91.xxx.xxx.150 [TTL=86400]
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