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Old 24th January 2007, 16:28
steveomach3ww steveomach3ww is offline
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RETAIN_ALIASES=No

#
# ENABLE TRAFFIC SHAPING
#
# If you say "Yes" or "yes" here, Shorewall will use a script that you
# supply to configure traffic shaping. The script must be named 'tcstart'
# and must be placed in a directory on your CONFIG_PATH.
#
# and must be placed in a directory on your CONFIG_PATH.
#
# If you say "No" or "no" then traffic shaping is not enabled.
#
# If you set TC_ENABLED=Internal or internal or leave the option empty then
# Shorewall will use its builtin traffic shaper (tc4shorewall written by
# Arne Bernin).
#
# See http://shorewall.net/traffic_shaping.htm for more information.

TC_ENABLED=Internal

#
# Clear Traffic Shapping/Control
#
# If this option is set to 'No' then Shorewall won't clear the current
# traffic control rules during [re]start. This setting is intended
# for use by people that prefer to configure traffic shaping when
# the network interfaces come up rather than when the firewall
# is started. If that is what you want to do, set TC_ENABLED=No and
# CLEAR_TC=No and do not supply an /etc/shorewall/tcstart file. That
# way, your traffic shaping rules can still use the 'fwmark'
# classifier based on packet marking defined in /etc/shorewall/tcrules.
#
# If omitted, CLEAR_TC=Yes is assumed.
#

CLEAR_TC=Yes

#
# Mark Packets in the forward chain
#
# When processing the tcrules file, Shorewall normally marks packets in the
# PREROUTING chain. To cause Shorewall to use the FORWARD chain instead, set
# this to "Yes". If not specified or if set to the empty value (e.g.,
# MARK_IN_FORWARD_CHAIN="") then MARK_IN_FORWARD_CHAIN=No is assumed.
#
# Marking packets in the FORWARD chain has the advantage that inbound
# packets destined for Masqueraded/SNATed local hosts have had their
# destination address rewritten so they can be marked based on their
# destination. When packets are marked in the PREROUTING chain, packets
# destined for Masqueraded/SNATed local hosts still have a destination address
# corresponding to the firewall's external interface.
#
# Note: Older kernels do not support marking packets in the FORWARD chain and
# setting this variable to Yes may cause startup problems.
#

MARK_IN_FORWARD_CHAIN=No

#
# MSS CLAMPING
#
# Set this variable to "Yes" or "yes" if you want the TCP "Clamp MSS to PMTU"
# option. This option is most commonly required when your internet
# interface is some variant of PPP (PPTP or PPPoE). Your kernel must
# have CONFIG_IP_NF_TARGET_TCPMSS set.
# interface is some variant of PPP (PPTP or PPPoE). Your kernel must
# have CONFIG_IP_NF_TARGET_TCPMSS set.
#
# [From the kernel help:
#
# This option adds a `TCPMSS' target, which allows you to alter the
# MSS value of TCP SYN packets, to control the maximum size for that
# connection (usually limiting it to your outgoing interface's MTU
# minus 40).
#
# This is used to overcome criminally braindead ISPs or servers which
# block ICMP Fragmentation Needed packets. The symptoms of this
# problem are that everything works fine from your Linux
# firewall/router, but machines behind it can never exchange large
# packets:
# 1) Web browsers connect, then hang with no data received.
# 2) Small mail works fine, but large emails hang.
# 3) ssh works fine, but scp hangs after initial handshaking.
# ]
#
# If left blank, or set to "No" or "no", the option is not enabled.
#
# You may also set this option to a numeric value in which case Shorewall will
# set up a rule to modify the MSS value in SYN packets to the value that
# you specify.
#
# Example:
#
# CLAMPMSS=1400
#

CLAMPMSS=No

#
# ROUTE FILTERING
#
# Set this variable to "Yes" or "yes" if you want kernel route filtering on all
# interfaces started while Shorewall is started (anti-spoofing measure).
#
# If this variable is not set or is set to the empty value, "No" is assumed.
# Regardless of the setting of ROUTE_FILTER, you can still enable route
# filtering on individual interfaces using the 'routefilter' option in the
# /etc/shorewall/interfaces file.
#

ROUTE_FILTER=Yes

#
# DNAT IP ADDRESS DETECTION
#
# Normally when Shorewall encounters the following rule:
#
# DNAT net loc:192.168.1.3 tcp 80
#
# it will forward TCP port 80 connections from the net to 192.168.1.3
# REGARDLESS OF THE ORIGINAL DESTINATION ADDRESS. This behavior is
# convenient for two reasons:
# REGARDLESS OF THE ORIGINAL DESTINATION ADDRESS. This behavior is
# convenient for two reasons:
#
# a) If the the network interface has a dynamic IP address, the
# firewall configuration will work even when the address
# changes.
#
# b) It saves having to configure the IP address in the rule
# while still allowing the firewall to be started before the
# internet interface is brought up.
#
# This default behavior can also have a negative effect. If the
# internet interface has more than one IP address then the above
# rule will forward connection requests on all of these addresses;
# that may not be what is desired.
#
# By setting DETECT_DNAT_IPADDRS=Yes, rules such as the above will apply
# only if the original destination address is the primary IP address of
# one of the interfaces associated with the source zone. Note that this
# requires all interfaces to the source zone to be up when the firewall
# is [re]started.
#

DETECT_DNAT_IPADDRS=No

#
# MUTEX TIMEOUT
#
# The value of this variable determines the number of seconds that programs
# will wait for exclusive access to the Shorewall lock file. After the number
# of seconds corresponding to the value of this variable, programs will assume
# that the last program to hold the lock died without releasing the lock.
#
# If not set or set to the empty value, a value of 60 (60 seconds) is assumed.
#
# An appropriate value for this parameter would be twice the length of time
# that it takes your firewall system to process a "shorewall restart" command.
#

MUTEX_TIMEOUT=60

#
# FOR ADMINS THAT REPEATEDLY SHOOT THEMSELVES IN THE FOOT
#
# Normally, when a "shorewall stop" command is issued or an error occurs during
# the execution of another shorewall command, Shorewall puts the firewall into
# a state where only traffic to/from the hosts listed in
# /etc/shorewall/routestopped is accepted.
#
# When performing remote administration on a Shorewall firewall, it is
# therefore recommended that the IP address of the computer being used for
# administration be added to the firewall's /etc/shorewall/routestopped file.
#
# Some administrators have a hard time remembering to do this with the result
# that they get to drive across town in the middle of the night to restart
# a remote firewall (or worse, they have to get someone out of bed to drive
# across town to restart a very remote firewall).

# a remote firewall (or worse, they have to get someone out of bed to drive
# across town to restart a very remote firewall).
#
# For those administrators, we offer ADMINISABSENTMINDED=Yes. With this
# setting, when the firewall enters the 'stopped' state:
#
# All traffic that is part of or related to established connections is still
# allowed and all OUTPUT traffic is allowed. This is in addition to traffic
# to and from hosts listed in /etc/shorewall/routestopped.
#
# If this variable is not set or it is set to the null value then
# ADMINISABSENTMINDED=No is assumed.
#

ADMINISABSENTMINDED=Yes

Last edited by steveomach3ww; 24th January 2007 at 16:31.
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