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Old 6th June 2008, 06:02
thecaoticone thecaoticone is offline
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I had the same problem. After several attempts, this was the only way I could get it to work.

as root do:

Code:
cp /usr/share/squirrelmail/plugins/change_sqlpass/config.php  /usr/share/squirrelmail/plugins/change_sqlpass/config.php.old

rm -rf /usr/share/squirrelmail/plugins/change_sqlpass/config.php
Then re-create the file with your favorite text editor:

Code:
nano  /usr/share/squirrelmail/plugins/change_sqlpass/config.php

Copy from here:
Code:
<?php

/**
  * SquirrelMail Change SQL Password Plugin
  * Copyright (C) 2001-2002 Tyler Akins
  *               2002 Thijs Kinkhorst <kink@users.sourceforge.net>
  *               2002-2005 Paul Lesneiwski <paul@openguild.net>
  * This program is licensed under GPL. See COPYING for details
  *
  * @package plugins
  * @subpackage Change SQL Password
  *
  */


   // Global Variables, don't touch these unless you want to break the plugin
   //
   global $csp_dsn, $password_update_queries, $lookup_password_query,
          $force_change_password_check_query, $password_encryption,
          $csp_salt_query, $csp_salt_static, $csp_secure_port,
          $csp_non_standard_http_port, $csp_delimiter, $csp_debug,
          $min_password_length, $max_password_length, $include_digit_in_password,
          $include_uppercase_letter_in_password, $include_lowercase_letter_in_password,
          $include_nonalphanumeric_in_password;



   // csp_dsn
   //
   // Theoretically, any SQL database supported by Pear should be supported
   // here.  The DSN (data source name) must contain the information needed
   // to connect to your database backend. A MySQL example is included below.
   // For more details about DSN syntax and list of supported database types,
   // please see:
   //   http://pear.php.net/manual/en/package.database.db.intro-dsn.php
   //
   $csp_dsn = 'mysql://mail_admin:mail_admin_password@localhost/mail';



   // lookup_password_query
   //
   // This plugin will always verify the user's old password
   // against their login password, but an extra check can also
   // be done against the database for more security if you
   // desire.  If you do not need the extra password check,
   // make sure this setting is empty.
   //
   // This is a query that returns a positive value if a user
   // and password pair are found in the database.
   //
   // This query should return one value (one row, one column), the
   // value being ideally a one or a zero, simply indicating that
   // the user/password pair does in fact exist in the database.
   //
   //   %1 in this query will be replaced with the full username
   //      (including domain), such as "jose@example.com"
   //   %2 in this query will be replaced with the username (without
   //      any domain portion), such as "jose"
   //   %3 in this query will be replaced with the domain name,
   //      such as "example.com"
   //   %4 in this query will be replaced with the current (old)
   //      password in whatever encryption format is needed per other
   //      plugin configuration settings (Note that the syntax of
   //      the password will be provided depending on your encryption
   //      choices, so you NEVER need to provide quotes around this
   //      value in the query here.)
   //   %5 in this query will be replaced with the current (old)
   //      password in unencrypted plain text.  If you do not use any
   //      password encryption, %4 and %5 will be the same values,
   //      except %4 will have double quotes around it and %5 will not.
   //
   //$lookup_password_query = '';
   // TERRIBLE SECURITY: $lookup_password_query = 'SELECT count(*) FROM users WHERE username = "%1" AND plain_password = "%5"';
   //$lookup_password_query = 'SELECT count(*) FROM users WHERE username = "%1" AND crypt_password = %4';
   $lookup_password_query = 'SELECT count(*) FROM users WHERE email = "%1" AND password = %4';


   // password_update_queries
   //
   // An array of SQL queries that will all be executed
   // whenever a password change attempt is made.
   //
   // Any number of queries may be included here.
   // The queries will be executed in the order given here.
   //
   //   %1 in all queries will be replaced with the full username
   //      (including domain), such as "jose@example.com"
   //   %2 in all queries will be replaced with the username (without
   //      any domain portion), such as "jose"
   //   %3 in all queries will be replaced with the domain name,
   //      such as "example.com"
   //   %4 in all queries will be replaced with the new password
   //      in whatever encryption format is needed per other
   //      plugin configuration settings (Note that the syntax of
   //      the password will be provided depending on your
   //      encryption choices, so you NEVER need to provide quotes
   //      around this value in the queries here.)
   //   %5 in all queries will be replaced with the new password
   //      in unencrypted plain text - BEWARE!  If you do not use
   //      any password encryption, %4 and %5 will be the same
   //      values, except %4 will have double quotes around it
   //      and %5 will not.
   //
//   $password_update_queries = array(
//            'UPDATE users SET crypt_password = %4 WHERE username = "%1"',
//            'UPDATE user_flags SET force_change_pwd = 0 WHERE username = "%1"',
//            'UPDATE users SET crypt_password = %4, force_change_pwd = 0 WHERE username = "%1"',
//                                   );
   $password_update_queries = array('UPDATE users SET password = %4 WHERE email = "%1"');


   // force_change_password_check_query
   //
   // A query that checks for a flag that indicates if a user
   // should be forced to change their password.  This query
   // should return one value (one row, one column) which is
   // zero if the user does NOT need to change their password,
   // or one if the user should be forced to change it now.
   //
   // This setting should be an empty string if you do not wish
   // to enable this functionality.
   //
   //   %1 in this query will be replaced with the full username
   //      (including domain), such as "jose@example.com"
   //   %2 in this query will be replaced with the username (without
   //      any domain portion), such as "jose"
   //   %3 in this query will be replaced with the domain name,
   //      such as "example.com"
   //
   //$force_change_password_check_query = 'SELECT IF(force_change_pwd = "yes", 1, 0) FROM users WHERE username = "%1"';
   //$force_change_password_check_query = 'SELECT force_change_pwd FROM users WHERE username = "%1"';
   $force_change_password_check_query = '';



   // password_encryption
   //
   // What encryption method do you use to store passwords
   // in your database?  Please use one of the following,
   // exactly as you see it:
   //
   //   NONE          Passwords are stored as plain text only
   //   MYSQLPWD      Passwords are stored using the MySQL password() function
   //   MYSQLENCRYPT  Passwords are stored using the MySQL encrypt() function
   //   PHPCRYPT      Passwords are stored using the PHP crypt() function
   //   MD5CRYPT      Passwords are stored using encrypted MD5 algorithm
   //   MD5           Passwords are stored as MD5 hash
   //
   //$password_encryption = 'MYSQLPWD';
   $password_encryption = 'MYSQLENCRYPT';


   // csp_salt_query
   // csp_salt_static
   //
   // Encryption types that need a salt need to know where to get
   // that salt.  If you have a constant, known salt value, you
   // should define it in $csp_salt_static.  Otherwise, leave that
   // value empty and define a value for the $csp_salt_query.
   //
   // Leave both values empty if you do not need (or use) salts
   // to encrypt your passwords.
   //
   // The query should return one value (one row, one column) which
   // is the salt value for the current user's password.  This
   // query is ignored if $csp_salt_static is anything but empty.
   //
   //   %1 in this query will be replaced with the full username
   //      (including domain), such as "jose@example.com"
   //   %2 in this query will be replaced with the username (without
   //      any domain portion), such as "jose"
   //   %3 in this query will be replaced with the domain name,
   //      such as "example.com"
   //
   //$csp_salt_static = 'LEFT(crypt_password, 2)';
   //$csp_salt_static = '"a4"';  // use this format with MYSQLENCRYPT
   //$csp_salt_static = '$2$blowsomefish$';  // use this format with PHPCRYPT
   //$csp_salt_static = '';
   $csp_salt_static = 'LEFT(password, 2)';

   //$csp_salt_query = 'SELECT SUBSTRING_INDEX(crypt_password, '$', 1) FROM users WHERE username = "%1"';
   //$csp_salt_query = 'SELECT SUBSTRING(crypt_password, (LENGTH(SUBSTRING_INDEX(crypt_password, '$', 2)) + 2)) FROM users WHERE username = "%1"';
   //$csp_salt_query = 'SELECT salt FROM users WHERE username = "%1"';
   //$csp_salt_query = '';



   // csp_secure_port
   //
   // You may ensure that SSL encryption is used during password
   // change by setting this to the port that your HTTPS is served
   // on (443 is typical).  Set to zero if you do not wish to force
   // an HTTPS connection when users are changing their passwords.
   //
   // You may override this value for certain domains, users, or
   // service levels through the Virtual Host Login (vlogin) plugin
   // by setting a value(s) for $vlogin_csp_secure_port in the vlogin
   // configuration.
   //
   $csp_secure_port = 0;
   //$csp_secure_port = 443;



   // csp_non_standard_http_port
   //
   // If you serve standard HTTP web requests on a non-standard
   // port (anything other than port 80), you should specify that
   // port number here.  Set to zero otherwise.
   //
   // You may override this value for certain domains, users, or
   // service levels through the Virtual Host Login (vlogin) plugin
   // by setting a value(s) for $vlogin_csp_non_standard_http_port
   // in the vlogin configuration.
   //
   //$csp_non_standard_http_port = 8080;
   $csp_non_standard_http_port = 0;



   // min_password_length
   // max_password_length
   // include_digit_in_password
   // include_uppercase_letter_in_password
   // include_lowercase_letter_in_password
   // include_nonalphanumeric_in_password
   //
   // You can set the minimum and maximum password lengths that
   // you accept or leave those settings as zero to indicate that
   // no limit should be applied.
   //
   // Turn on any of the other settings here to check that the
   // new password contains at least one digit, upper case letter,
   // lower case letter and/or one non-alphanumeric character.
   //
   $min_password_length = 6;
   $max_password_length = 0;
   $include_digit_in_password = 0;
   $include_uppercase_letter_in_password = 0;
   $include_lowercase_letter_in_password = 0;
   $include_nonalphanumeric_in_password = 0;



   // csp_delimiter
   //
   // if your system has usernames with something other than
   // an "@" sign separating the user and domain portion,
   // specify that character here
   //
   //$csp_delimiter = '|';
   $csp_delimiter = '@';



   // debug mode
   //
   $csp_debug = 0;



?>


Last change this line to match you mail_admin_user and mail_admin_password:

Code:
$csp_dsn = 'mysql://mail_admin:mail_admin_password@localhost/mail';

Last edited by thecaoticone; 6th June 2008 at 09:26.
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