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-   -   Ubuntu-Server 6.10 As A Firewall/Gateway Vpn Server Problem (http://www.howtoforge.com/forums/showthread.php?t=9923)

steveomach3ww 18th January 2007 17:58

Ubuntu-Server 6.10 As A Firewall/Gateway Vpn Server Problem
 
I would like to start off by saying how much i love these howto's, they have helped me out more than anyone could know. Here is my problem that i have i just went through the whole setup of the Ubuntu-Server 6.10 As A Firewall/Gateway and for some reason i cannot connect to my vpn server. Here is the log file for then i try ty connect.

Jan 18 10:57:05 fireviper pptpd[14298]: MGR: Manager process started
Jan 18 10:57:05 fireviper pptpd[14298]: MGR: Maximum of 10 connections available
Jan 18 10:57:11 fireviper kernel: [42952565.860000] Shorewall:net2fw:DROP:IN=eth0 OUT= MAC=00:07:95:de:47:5e:00:d0:b7:0e:70:f1:08:00 SRC=12.169.23.5 DST=192.168.2.1 LEN=48 TOS=0x00 PREC=0x00 TTL=127 ID=38144 DF PROTO=TCP SPT=45112 DPT=1723 WINDOW=65535 RES=0x00 SYN URGP=0
Jan 18 10:57:14 fireviper kernel: [42952568.820000] Shorewall:net2fw:DROP:IN=eth0 OUT= MAC=00:07:95:de:47:5e:00:d0:b7:0e:70:f1:08:00 SRC=12.169.23.5 DST=192.168.2.1 LEN=48 TOS=0x00 PREC=0x00 TTL=127 ID=38173 DF PROTO=TCP SPT=45112 DPT=1723 WINDOW=65535 RES=0x00 SYN URGP=0
Jan 18 10:57:20 fireviper kernel: [42952574.860000] Shorewall:net2fw:DROP:IN=eth0 OUT= MAC=00:07:95:de:47:5e:00:d0:b7:0e:70:f1:08:00 SRC=12.169.23.5 DST=192.168.2.1 LEN=48 TOS=0x00 PREC=0x00 TTL=127 ID=38195 DF PROTO=TCP SPT=45112 DPT=1723 WINDOW=65535 RES=0x00 SYN URGP=0

Thank You

falko 19th January 2007 22:25

Seems like a shorewall misconfiguration. Can you tell us a little more about your network setup?
What's in shorewall's configuration file?

steveomach3ww 24th January 2007 16:25

Vpn Connection Problems
 
My network has a static outside ip address and a internal static of 192.168.1.1. Here is a copy of the syslog when i try to connect either with the firewall on or off.

Jan 24 09:14:10 mathesfire steveo: Shorewall Stopped
Jan 24 09:14:10 mathesfire steveo: Shorewall Cleared
Jan 24 09:14:21 mathesfire pptpd[16966]: CTRL: Client 12.169.XXX.XXX control connection started
Jan 24 09:14:21 mathesfire pptpd[16966]: CTRL: Starting call (launching pppd, opening GRE)
Jan 24 09:14:21 mathesfire pppd[16967]: pppd 2.4.4 started by root, uid 0
Jan 24 09:14:21 mathesfire pppd[16967]: using channel 7
Jan 24 09:14:21 mathesfire pppd[16967]: Using interface ppp0
Jan 24 09:14:21 mathesfire pppd[16967]: Connect: ppp0 <--> /dev/pts/1
Jan 24 09:14:21 mathesfire pppd[16967]: sent [LCP ConfReq id=0x1 <asyncmap 0x0> <auth chap MS-v2> <magic 0x6f0aa0af> <pcomp> <accomp>]
Jan 24 09:14:21 mathesfire pptpd[16966]: GRE: read(fd=7,buffer=80505a0,len=8260) from network failed: status = -1 error = Protocol not available
Jan 24 09:14:21 mathesfire pptpd[16966]: CTRL: GRE read or PTY write failed (gre,pty)=(7,6)
Jan 24 09:14:21 mathesfire pptpd[16966]: CTRL: Reaping child PPP[16967]
Jan 24 09:14:22 mathesfire pppd[16967]: Modem hangup
Jan 24 09:14:22 mathesfire pppd[16967]: Connection terminated.
Jan 24 09:14:22 mathesfire pppd[16967]: Exit.
Jan 24 09:14:22 mathesfire pptpd[16966]: CTRL: Client 12.169.XXX.XXX control connection finished

root@mathesfire:/etc/shorewall# /etc/init.d/shorewall start
Starting "Shorewall firewall": done.
root@mathesfire:/etc/shorewall# tail -f /var/log/syslog
Jan 24 09:14:35 mathesfire pppd[18749]: Using interface ppp0
Jan 24 09:14:35 mathesfire pppd[18749]: Connect: ppp0 <--> /dev/pts/1
Jan 24 09:14:35 mathesfire pppd[18749]: sent [LCP ConfReq id=0x1 <asyncmap 0x0> <auth chap MS-v2> <magic 0xbb8ac80b> <pcomp> <accomp>]
Jan 24 09:14:35 mathesfire pptpd[18748]: GRE: xmit failed from decaps_hdlc: Operation not permitted
Jan 24 09:14:35 mathesfire pptpd[18748]: CTRL: PTY read or GRE write failed (pty,gre)=(6,7)
Jan 24 09:14:35 mathesfire pptpd[18748]: CTRL: Reaping child PPP[18749]
Jan 24 09:14:35 mathesfire pppd[18749]: Modem hangup
Jan 24 09:14:35 mathesfire pppd[18749]: Connection terminated.
Jan 24 09:14:35 mathesfire pppd[18749]: Exit.
Jan 24 09:14:35 mathesfire pptpd[18748]: CTRL: Client 12.169.XXX.XXX control connection finished


AND HERE IS THE SHOREWALL CONFIG FILE

################################################## #############################
# /etc/shorewall/shorewall.conf V3.0 - Change the following variables to
# match your setup
#
# This program is under GPL [http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/gpl.htm]
#
# This file should be placed in /etc/shorewall
#
# (c) 1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005 - Tom Eastep (teastep@shorewall.net)
#
# >>>>>>>>>>>>> NOTE TO USERS UPGRADING FROM 2.x <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<
#
# Most problems associated with upgrades come from two causes:
#
# - The user didn't read and follow the migration considerations in the
# release notes.
#
# - The user mis-handled the /etc/shorewall/shorewall.conf file during
# upgrade. Shorewall is designed to allow the default behavior of
# the product to evolve over time. To make this possible, the design
# assumes that you will not replace your current shorewall.conf file
# during upgrades. If you feel absolutely compelled to have the latest
# comments and options in your shorewall.conf then you must proceed
# carefully.
#
# The new/changed options in shorewall 3.0 are listed below. If you don't
# want to convert to the new 3.0 format for /etc/shorewall/zones and you
# don't want to replace your current rules that use 2.x builtin actions,
# then if you plan to use this copy of shorewall.conf file then you must
# change it as follows:
#
# - SPECFILE
#
# This file has IPSECFILE=zones. You want to set it to IPSECFILE=ipsec.
# This will indicate that your /etc/shorewall/zones file is in the
# pre-3.0 format.
#
# - FW
#
# This file has FW undefined. If you have named your firewall zone
# something other than 'fw' then you must set FW accordingly.
#
# - MAPOLDACTIONS
#
# This file has MAPOLDACTIONS=No. You want to set it to
# MAPOLDACTIONS=Yes in order to permit rules that use the 2.x builtin
# actions such as AllowPing to continue to work.
################################################## #############################
# S T A R T U P E N A B L E D
################################################## #############################
#
# Once you have configured Shorewall, you may change the setting of
# this variable to 'Yes'
#

STARTUP_ENABLED=Yes
################################################## #############################
# L O G G I N G
################################################## #############################
#
# General note about log levels. Log levels are a method of describing
# to syslog (8) the importance of a message and a number of parameters
# in this file have log levels as their value.
#
# These levels are defined by syslog and are used to determine the destination
# of the messages through entries in /etc/syslog.conf (5). The syslog
# documentation refers to these as "priorities"; Netfilter calls them "levels"
# and Shorewall also uses that term.
#
# Valid levels are:
#
# 7 debug
# 6 info
# 5 notice
# 4 warning
# 3 err
# 2 crit
# 1 alert
# 0 emerg
#
# For most Shorewall logging, a level of 6 (info) is appropriate. Shorewall
# log messages are generated by NetFilter and are logged using facility
# 'kern' and the level that you specifify. If you are unsure of the level
# to choose, 6 (info) is a safe bet. You may specify levels by name or by
# number.
#
# If you have built your kernel with ULOG target support, you may also
# specify a log level of ULOG (must be all caps). Rather than log its
# messages to syslogd, Shorewall will direct netfilter to log the messages
# via the ULOG target which will send them to a process called 'ulogd'.
# ulogd is available with most Linux distributions (although it probably isn't
# installed by default). Ulogd is also available from
# http://www.gnumonks.org/projects/ulogd and can be configured to log all
# Shorewall message to their own log file
################################################## #############################
#
# LOG FILE LOCATION
#
# This variable tells the /sbin/shorewall program where to look for Shorewall
# log messages. If not set or set to an empty string (e.g., LOGFILE="") then
# /var/log/messages is assumed.
#
# WARNING: The LOGFILE variable simply tells the 'shorewall' program where to
# look for Shorewall messages.It does NOT control the destination for
# these messages. For information about how to do that, see
#
# http://www.shorewall.net/shorewall_logging.html
#

LOGFILE=/var/log/messages

#
# LOG FORMAT
#
# Shell 'printf' Formatting template for the --log-prefix value in log messages
# generated by Shorewall to identify Shorewall log messages. The supplied
# template is expected to accept either two or three arguments; the first is
# the chain name, the second (optional) is the logging rule number within that
# chain and the third is the ACTION specifying the disposition of the packet
# being logged. You must use the %d formatting type for the rule number; if
# your template does not contain %d then the rule number will not be included.
#
# If you want to integrate Shorewall with fireparse, then set LOGFORMAT as:
#
# LOGFORMAT="fp=%s:%d a=%s "
#
# If not specified or specified as empty (LOGFORMAT="") then the value
# "Shorewall:%s:%s:" is assumed.
#
# CAUTION: /sbin/shorewall uses the leading part of the LOGFORMAT string (up
# to but not including the first '%') to find log messages in the 'show log',
# 'status' and 'hits' commands. This part should not be omitted (the
# LOGFORMAT should not begin with "%") and the leading part should be
# sufficiently unique for /sbin/shorewall to identify Shorewall messages.
#

LOGFORMAT="Shorewall:%s:%s:"

#
# LOG FORMAT Continued
#
# Using the default LOGFORMAT, chain names may not exceed 11 characters or
# truncation of the log prefix may occur. Longer chain names may be used with
# log tags if you set LOGTAGONLY=Yes. With LOGTAGONLY=Yes, if a log tag is
# specified then the tag is included in the log prefix in place of the chain
# name.
#

LOGTAGONLY=No

#
# LOG RATE LIMITING
#
# The next two variables can be used to control the amount of log output
# generated. LOGRATE is expressed as a number followed by an optional
# `/second', `/minute', `/hour', or `/day' suffix and specifies the maximum
# rate at which a particular message will occur. LOGBURST determines the
# maximum initial burst size that will be logged. If set empty, the default
# value of 5 will be used.
#

steveomach3ww 24th January 2007 16:26

[SIZE="1"]# If BOTH variables are set empty then logging will not be rate-limited.
#
# Example:
#
# LOGRATE=10/minute
# LOGBURST=5
# LOGRATE=10/minute
# LOGBURST=5
#
# For each logging rule, the first time the rule is reached, the packet
# will be logged; in fact, since the burst is 5, the first five packets
# will be logged. After this, it will be 6 seconds (1 minute divided by
# the rate of 10) before a message will be logged from the rule, regardless
# of how many packets reach it. Also, every 6 seconds which passes without
# matching a packet, one of the bursts will be regained; if no packets hit
# the rule for 30 seconds, the burst will be fully recharged; back where
# we started.
#

LOGRATE=
LOGBURST=

#
# LOG ALL NEW
#
# This option should only be used when you are trying to analyze a problem.
# It causes all packets in the Netfilter NEW state to be logged as the
# first rule in each builtin chain. To use this option, set LOGALLNEW to
# the log level that you want these packets logged at (e.g.,
# LOGALLNEW=debug).
#

LOGALLNEW=

#
# BLACKLIST LOG LEVEL
#
# Set this variable to the syslogd level that you want blacklist packets logged
# (beware of DOS attacks resulting from such logging). If not set, no logging
# of blacklist packets occurs.
#
# See the comment at the top of this section for a description of log levels
#

BLACKLIST_LOGLEVEL=

#
# MAC List Log Level
#
# Specifies the logging level for connection requests that fail MAC
# verification. If set to the empty value (MACLIST_LOG_LEVEL="") then
# such connection requests will not be logged.
#
# See the comment at the top of this section for a description of log levels
#

MACLIST_LOG_LEVEL=info

#
# TCP FLAGS Log Level
#
# Specifies the logging level for packets that fail TCP Flags
# verification. If set to the empty value (TCP_FLAGS_LOG_LEVEL="") then
# Specifies the logging level for packets that fail TCP Flags
# verification. If set to the empty value (TCP_FLAGS_LOG_LEVEL="") then
# such packets will not be logged.
#
# See the comment at the top of this section for a description of log levels
#

TCP_FLAGS_LOG_LEVEL=info

#
# RFC1918 Log Level
#
# Specifies the logging level for packets that fail RFC 1918
# verification. If set to the empty value (RFC1918_LOG_LEVEL="") then
# RFC1918_LOG_LEVEL=info is assumed.
#
# See the comment at the top of this section for a description of log levels
#

RFC1918_LOG_LEVEL=info

#
# SMURF Log Level
#
# Specifies the logging level for smurf packets dropped by the
#'nosmurfs' interface option in /etc/shorewall/interfaces and in
# /etc/shorewall/hosts. If set to the empty value ( SMURF_LOG_LEVEL=""
# ) then dropped smurfs are not logged.
#
# See the comment at the top of this section for a description of log levels
#

SMURF_LOG_LEVEL=info

#
# MARTIAN LOGGING
#
# Setting LOG_MARTIANS=Yes will enable kernel logging of all received packets
# that have impossible source IP addresses. This logging may be enabled
# on individual interfaces by using the 'logmartians' option in
# /etc/shorewall/interfaces.
#

LOG_MARTIANS=No

################################################## #############################
# L O C A T I O N O F F I L E S A N D D I R E C T O R I E S
################################################## #############################
#
# IPTABLES
#
# Full path to iptables executable Shorewall uses to build the firewall. If
# not specified or if specified with an empty value (e.g., IPTABLES="") then
# the iptables executable located via the PATH setting below is used.
#

IPTABLES=
IPTABLES=

#
# PATH - Change this if you want to change the order in which Shorewall
# searches directories for executable files.
#

PATH=/sbin:/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/bin:/usr/local/bin:/usr/local/sbin

#
# SHELL
#
# The firewall script is normally interpreted by /bin/sh. If you wish to change
# the shell used to interpret that script, specify the shell here.
#

SHOREWALL_SHELL=/bin/sh

# SUBSYSTEM LOCK FILE
#
# Set this to the name of the lock file expected by your init scripts. For
# RedHat, this should be /var/lock/subsys/shorewall. If your init scripts don't
# use lock files, set this to "".
#

SUBSYSLOCK=""

#
# KERNEL MODULE DIRECTORY
#
# If your netfilter kernel modules are in a directory other than
# /lib/modules/$(uname -r)/kernel/net/ipv4/netfilter then specify that
# directory in this variable. Example: MODULESDIR=/etc/modules.
#

MODULESDIR=

#
# CONFIGURATION SEARCH PATH
#
# This option holds a list of directory names separated by colons
# (":"). Shorewall will search each directory in turn when looking for a
# configuration file. When processing a 'try' command or a command
# containing the "-c" option or that specifies a configuration directory,
# Shorewall will automatically add the directory specified in the command
# to the front of this list.
#
# If not specified or specified as null ("CONFIG_PATH=""),
# CONFIG_PATH=/etc/shorewall:/usr/share/shorewall is assumed.
#

CONFIG_PATH=/etc/shorewall:/usr/share/shorewall

#
# RESTORE SCRIPT
#
# RESTORE SCRIPT
#
# This option determines the script to be run in the following cases:
#
# shorewall -f start
# shorewall restore
# shorewall save
# shorewall forget
# Failure of shorewall start or shorewall restart
#
# The value of the option must be the name of an executable file in the
# directory /var/lib/shorewall. If this option is not set or if it is
# set to the empty value (RESTOREFILE="") then RESTOREFILE=restore is
# assumed.
#

RESTOREFILE=

#
# OLD ZONE FILE FORMAT
#
# Previous versions of Shorewall had both a 'zones' file and an 'ipsec' file.
# Beginning with 2.5.0, those files were combined. For users who haven't
# converted, we offer this variable that sets the name of the file for ipsec
# information. This option must take the value "zones" or "ipsec". If the
# option is not set or is set to the empty value (IPSECFILE="") then "ipsec"
# is assumed.
#

IPSECFILE=zones

################################################## #############################
# F I R E W A L L O P T I O N S
################################################## #############################

# NAME OF THE FIREWALL ZONE
#
# Name of the firewall zone -- if not set or if set to an empty string, then
# you must include a definition of the firewall zone in /etc/shorewall/zones.
#
# Note: If IPSECFILE=zones above then you must NOT set FW and you must define
# the firewall zone in /etc/shorewall/zones.

FW=

#
# ENABLE IP FORWARDING
#
# If you say "On" or "on" here, IPV4 Packet Forwarding is enabled. If you
# say "Off" or "off", packet forwarding will be disabled. You would only want
# to disable packet forwarding if you are installing Shorewall on a
# standalone system or if you want all traffic through the Shorewall system
# to be handled by proxies.
#
# If you set this variable to "Keep" or "keep", Shorewall will neither
# enable nor disable packet forwarding.
#
# enable nor disable packet forwarding.
#

IP_FORWARDING=On

#
# AUTOMATICALLY ADD NAT IP ADDRESSES
#
# If you say "Yes" or "yes" here, Shorewall will automatically add IP addresses
# for each NAT external address that you give in /etc/shorewall/nat. If you say
# "No" or "no", you must add these aliases youself.
#
# WARNING: Addresses added by ADD_IP_ALIASES=Yes are deleted and re-added
# during processing of the "shorewall restart" command. As a consequence,
# connections using those addresses may be severed.
#

ADD_IP_ALIASES=Yes

#
# AUTOMATICALLY ADD SNAT IP ADDRESSES
#
# If you say "Yes" or "yes" here, Shorewall will automatically add IP addresses
# for each SNAT external address that you give in /etc/shorewall/masq. If you
# say "No" or "no", you must add these aliases youself. LEAVE THIS SET TO "No"
# unless you are sure that you need it -- most people don't!!!
#
# WARNING: Addresses added by ADD_SNAT_ALIASES=Yes are deleted and re-added
# during processing of the "shorewall restart" command. As a consequence,
# connections using those addresses may be severed.
#

ADD_SNAT_ALIASES=No

#
# RETAIN EXISTING ALIASES/IP ADDRESSES
#
# Normally, when ADD_IP_ALIASES=Yes and/or ADD_SNAT_ALIASES=Yes then Shorewall
# will first delete the address then re-add it. This is to ensure that the
# address is added with the specified label. Unfortunately, this can cause
# problems if it results in the deletion of the last IP address on an
# interface because then all routes through the interface are automatically
# removed.
#
# You can cause Shorewall to retain existing addresses by setting
# RETAIN_ALIASES=Yes.
#

steveomach3ww 24th January 2007 16:28

RETAIN_ALIASES=No

#
# ENABLE TRAFFIC SHAPING
#
# If you say "Yes" or "yes" here, Shorewall will use a script that you
# supply to configure traffic shaping. The script must be named 'tcstart'
# and must be placed in a directory on your CONFIG_PATH.
#
# and must be placed in a directory on your CONFIG_PATH.
#
# If you say "No" or "no" then traffic shaping is not enabled.
#
# If you set TC_ENABLED=Internal or internal or leave the option empty then
# Shorewall will use its builtin traffic shaper (tc4shorewall written by
# Arne Bernin).
#
# See http://shorewall.net/traffic_shaping.htm for more information.

TC_ENABLED=Internal

#
# Clear Traffic Shapping/Control
#
# If this option is set to 'No' then Shorewall won't clear the current
# traffic control rules during [re]start. This setting is intended
# for use by people that prefer to configure traffic shaping when
# the network interfaces come up rather than when the firewall
# is started. If that is what you want to do, set TC_ENABLED=No and
# CLEAR_TC=No and do not supply an /etc/shorewall/tcstart file. That
# way, your traffic shaping rules can still use the 'fwmark'
# classifier based on packet marking defined in /etc/shorewall/tcrules.
#
# If omitted, CLEAR_TC=Yes is assumed.
#

CLEAR_TC=Yes

#
# Mark Packets in the forward chain
#
# When processing the tcrules file, Shorewall normally marks packets in the
# PREROUTING chain. To cause Shorewall to use the FORWARD chain instead, set
# this to "Yes". If not specified or if set to the empty value (e.g.,
# MARK_IN_FORWARD_CHAIN="") then MARK_IN_FORWARD_CHAIN=No is assumed.
#
# Marking packets in the FORWARD chain has the advantage that inbound
# packets destined for Masqueraded/SNATed local hosts have had their
# destination address rewritten so they can be marked based on their
# destination. When packets are marked in the PREROUTING chain, packets
# destined for Masqueraded/SNATed local hosts still have a destination address
# corresponding to the firewall's external interface.
#
# Note: Older kernels do not support marking packets in the FORWARD chain and
# setting this variable to Yes may cause startup problems.
#

MARK_IN_FORWARD_CHAIN=No

#
# MSS CLAMPING
#
# Set this variable to "Yes" or "yes" if you want the TCP "Clamp MSS to PMTU"
# option. This option is most commonly required when your internet
# interface is some variant of PPP (PPTP or PPPoE). Your kernel must
# have CONFIG_IP_NF_TARGET_TCPMSS set.
# interface is some variant of PPP (PPTP or PPPoE). Your kernel must
# have CONFIG_IP_NF_TARGET_TCPMSS set.
#
# [From the kernel help:
#
# This option adds a `TCPMSS' target, which allows you to alter the
# MSS value of TCP SYN packets, to control the maximum size for that
# connection (usually limiting it to your outgoing interface's MTU
# minus 40).
#
# This is used to overcome criminally braindead ISPs or servers which
# block ICMP Fragmentation Needed packets. The symptoms of this
# problem are that everything works fine from your Linux
# firewall/router, but machines behind it can never exchange large
# packets:
# 1) Web browsers connect, then hang with no data received.
# 2) Small mail works fine, but large emails hang.
# 3) ssh works fine, but scp hangs after initial handshaking.
# ]
#
# If left blank, or set to "No" or "no", the option is not enabled.
#
# You may also set this option to a numeric value in which case Shorewall will
# set up a rule to modify the MSS value in SYN packets to the value that
# you specify.
#
# Example:
#
# CLAMPMSS=1400
#

CLAMPMSS=No

#
# ROUTE FILTERING
#
# Set this variable to "Yes" or "yes" if you want kernel route filtering on all
# interfaces started while Shorewall is started (anti-spoofing measure).
#
# If this variable is not set or is set to the empty value, "No" is assumed.
# Regardless of the setting of ROUTE_FILTER, you can still enable route
# filtering on individual interfaces using the 'routefilter' option in the
# /etc/shorewall/interfaces file.
#

ROUTE_FILTER=Yes

#
# DNAT IP ADDRESS DETECTION
#
# Normally when Shorewall encounters the following rule:
#
# DNAT net loc:192.168.1.3 tcp 80
#
# it will forward TCP port 80 connections from the net to 192.168.1.3
# REGARDLESS OF THE ORIGINAL DESTINATION ADDRESS. This behavior is
# convenient for two reasons:
# REGARDLESS OF THE ORIGINAL DESTINATION ADDRESS. This behavior is
# convenient for two reasons:
#
# a) If the the network interface has a dynamic IP address, the
# firewall configuration will work even when the address
# changes.
#
# b) It saves having to configure the IP address in the rule
# while still allowing the firewall to be started before the
# internet interface is brought up.
#
# This default behavior can also have a negative effect. If the
# internet interface has more than one IP address then the above
# rule will forward connection requests on all of these addresses;
# that may not be what is desired.
#
# By setting DETECT_DNAT_IPADDRS=Yes, rules such as the above will apply
# only if the original destination address is the primary IP address of
# one of the interfaces associated with the source zone. Note that this
# requires all interfaces to the source zone to be up when the firewall
# is [re]started.
#

DETECT_DNAT_IPADDRS=No

#
# MUTEX TIMEOUT
#
# The value of this variable determines the number of seconds that programs
# will wait for exclusive access to the Shorewall lock file. After the number
# of seconds corresponding to the value of this variable, programs will assume
# that the last program to hold the lock died without releasing the lock.
#
# If not set or set to the empty value, a value of 60 (60 seconds) is assumed.
#
# An appropriate value for this parameter would be twice the length of time
# that it takes your firewall system to process a "shorewall restart" command.
#

MUTEX_TIMEOUT=60

#
# FOR ADMINS THAT REPEATEDLY SHOOT THEMSELVES IN THE FOOT
#
# Normally, when a "shorewall stop" command is issued or an error occurs during
# the execution of another shorewall command, Shorewall puts the firewall into
# a state where only traffic to/from the hosts listed in
# /etc/shorewall/routestopped is accepted.
#
# When performing remote administration on a Shorewall firewall, it is
# therefore recommended that the IP address of the computer being used for
# administration be added to the firewall's /etc/shorewall/routestopped file.
#
# Some administrators have a hard time remembering to do this with the result
# that they get to drive across town in the middle of the night to restart
# a remote firewall (or worse, they have to get someone out of bed to drive
# across town to restart a very remote firewall).

# a remote firewall (or worse, they have to get someone out of bed to drive
# across town to restart a very remote firewall).
#
# For those administrators, we offer ADMINISABSENTMINDED=Yes. With this
# setting, when the firewall enters the 'stopped' state:
#
# All traffic that is part of or related to established connections is still
# allowed and all OUTPUT traffic is allowed. This is in addition to traffic
# to and from hosts listed in /etc/shorewall/routestopped.
#
# If this variable is not set or it is set to the null value then
# ADMINISABSENTMINDED=No is assumed.
#

ADMINISABSENTMINDED=Yes

steveomach3ww 24th January 2007 16:29

#
# BLACKLIST Behavior
#
# Shorewall offers two types of blacklisting:
#
# - static blacklisting through the /etc/shorewall/blacklist file
# together with the 'blacklist' interface option.
# - dynamic blacklisting using the 'drop', 'reject' and 'allow' commands.
#
# The following variable determines whether the blacklist is checked for each
# packet or for each new connection.
#
# BLACKLISTNEWONLY=Yes Only consult blacklists for new connection
# requests
#
# BLACKLISTNEWONLY=No Consult blacklists for all packets.
#
# If the BLACKLISTNEWONLY option is not set or is set to the empty value then
# BLACKLISTNEWONLY=No is assumed.
#

BLACKLISTNEWONLY=Yes

#
# Users with a large blacklist find that "shorwall [re]start" takes a long
# time and that new connections are disabled during that time. By setting
# DELAYBLACKLISTLOAD=Yes, you can cause Shorewall to enable new connections
# before loading the blacklist.
#

DELAYBLACKLISTLOAD=No

# MODULE NAME SUFFIX
#
# When loading a module named in /etc/shorewall/modules, Shorewall normally
# looks in the MODULES DIRECTORY (see MODULESDIR above) for files whose names
# end in ".o", ".ko", ".gz", "o.gz" or "ko.gz" . If your distribution uses a
# different naming convention then you can specify the suffix (extension) for
# module names in this variable.
#
# To see what suffix is used by your distribution:
#
# To see what suffix is used by your distribution:
#
# ls /lib/modules/$(uname -r)/kernel/net/ipv4/netfilter
#
# All of the file names listed should have the same suffix (extension). Set
# MODULE_SUFFIX to that suffix.
#
# Examples:
#
# If all file names end with ".kzo" then set MODULE_SUFFIX="kzo"
# If all file names end with ".kz.o" then set MODULE_SUFFIX="kz.o"
#

MODULE_SUFFIX=

#
# DISABLE IPV6
#
# Distributions (notably SuSE) are beginning to ship with IPV6
# enabled. If you are not using IPV6, you are at risk of being
# exploited by users who do. Setting DISABLE_IPV6=Yes will cause
# Shorewall to disable IPV6 traffic to/from and through your
# firewall system. This requires that you have ip6tables installed.

DISABLE_IPV6=Yes

#
# BRIDGING
#
# If you wish to restrict connections through a bridge
# (see http://bridge.sf.net), then set BRIDGING=Yes. Your kernel must have
# the physdev match option enabled; that option is available at the above URL
# for 2.4 kernels and is included as a standard part of the 2.6 series
# kernels. If not specified or specified as empty (BRIDGING="") then "No" is
# assumed.
#
BRIDGING=No

#
# DYNAMIC ZONES
#
# If you need to be able to add and delete hosts from zones dynamically then
# set DYNAMIC_ZONES=Yes. Otherwise, set DYNAMIC_ZONES=No.

DYNAMIC_ZONES=No

#
# USE PKTTYPE MATCH
#
# Some users have reported problems with the PKTTYPE match extension not being
# able to match certain broadcast packets. If you set PKTTYPE=No then Shorewall
# will use IP addresses to detect broadcasts rather than pkttype. If not given
# or if given as empty (PKTTYPE="") then PKTTYPE=Yes is assumed.
#
#

PKTTYPE=Yes

#
# RFC 1918 BEHAVIOR
#
# Traditionally, the RETURN target in the 'rfc1918' file has caused 'norfc1918'
# processing to cease for a packet if the packet's source IP address matches
# the rule. Thus, if you have:
#
# SUBNETS TARGET
# 192.168.1.0/24 RETURN
#
# then traffic from 192.168.1.4 to 10.0.3.9 will be accepted even though you
# also have:
#
# SUBNETS TARGET
# 10.0.0.0/8 logdrop
#
# Setting RFC1918_STRICT=Yes will cause such traffic to be logged and dropped
# since while the packet's source matches the RETURN rule, the packet's
# destination matches the 'logdrop' rule.
#
# If not specified or specified as empty (e.g., RFC1918_STRICT="") then
# RFC1918_STRICT=No is assumed.
#
# WARNING: RFC1918_STRICT=Yes requires that your kernel and iptables support
# 'conntrack state' match.
#

RFC1918_STRICT=No

#
# MAC List Table
#
# Normally, MAC verification occurs in the filter table (INPUT and FORWARD)
# chains. When forwarding a packet from an interface with MAC verification
# to a bridge interface, that doesn't work.
#
# This problem can be worked around by setting MACLIST_TABLE=mangle which
# will cause Mac verification to occur out of the PREROUTING chain. Because
# REJECT isn't available in that environment, you may not specify
# MACLIST_DISPOSITION=REJECT with MACLIST_TABLE=mangle.

MACLIST_TABLE=filter

#
# MACLIST caching
#
# If your iptables and kernel support the "Recent Match" (see the output of
# "shorewall check" near the top), you can cache the results of a 'maclist'
# file lookup and thus reduce the overhead associated with MAC Verification
# (/etc/shorewall/maclist).
#
# When a new connection arrives from a 'maclist' interface, the packet passes
# through the list of entries for that interface in /etc/shorewall/maclist. If
# When a new connection arrives from a 'maclist' interface, the packet passes
# through the list of entries for that interface in /etc/shorewall/maclist. If
# there is a match then the source IP address is added to the 'Recent' set for
# that interface. Subsequent connection attempts from that IP address occuring
# within $MACLIST_TTL seconds will be accepted without having to scan all of
# the entries. After $MACLIST_TTL from the first accepted connection request,
# the next connection request from that IP address will be checked against
# the entire list.
#
# If MACLIST_TTL is not specified or is specified as empty (e.g,
# MACLIST_TTL="" or is specified as zero then 'maclist' lookups will not
# be cached.
#

MACLIST_TTL=

#
# Save/Restore IPSETS
#
# If SAVE_IPSETS=Yes then Shorewall will:
#
# Restore the last saved ipset contents during "shorewall [re]start"
# Save the current ipset contents during "shorewall save"
#
# Regardless of the setting of SAVE_IPSETS, if ipset contents were
# saved during a "shorewall save" then they will be restored during
# a subsequent "shorewall restore".
#

SAVE_IPSETS=No

#
# Map Old Actions
#
# Previously, Shorewall included a large number of standard actions (AllowPing,
# AllowFTP, ...). These have been replaced with parameterized macros. For
# compatibility, Shorewall can map the old names into invocations of the new
# macros if you set MAPOLDACTIONS=Yes. If this option is not set or is set to
# the empty value (MAPOLDACTIONS="") then MAPOLDACTIONS=Yes is assumed
#

MAPOLDACTIONS=No

#
# Fast ESTABLISHED/RELATED handling
#
# Normally, Shorewall accepting ESTABLISHED/RELATED packets until these packets
# reach the chain in which the original connection was accepted. So for packets
# going from the 'loc' zone to the 'net' zone, ESTABLISHED/RELATED packets are
# ACCEPTED in the 'loc2net' chain.
#
# If you set FASTACCEPT=Yes, then ESTABLISHED/RELEATED packets are accepted
# early in the INPUT, FORWARD and OUTPUT chains. If you set
# FASTACCEPT=Yes then you may not include rules in the ESTABLISHED and
# RELATED sections of the rules file.

FASTACCEPT=No
FASTACCEPT=No

################################################## #############################
# P A C K E T D I S P O S I T I O N
################################################## #############################
#
# BLACKLIST DISPOSITION
#
# Set this variable to the action that you want to perform on packets from
# Blacklisted systems. Must be DROP or REJECT. If not set or set to empty,
# DROP is assumed.
#

BLACKLIST_DISPOSITION=DROP

#
# MAC List Disposition
#
# This variable determines the disposition of connection requests arriving
# on interfaces that have the 'maclist' option and that are from a device
# that is not listed for that interface in /etc/shorewall/maclist. Valid
# values are ACCEPT, DROP and REJECT. If not specified or specified as
# empty (MACLIST_DISPOSITION="") then REJECT is assumed
#

MACLIST_DISPOSITION=REJECT

#
# TCP FLAGS Disposition
#
# This variable determins the disposition of packets having an invalid
# combination of TCP flags that are received on interfaces having the
# 'tcpflags' option specified in /etc/shorewall/interfaces or in
# /etc/shorewall/hosts. If not specified or specified as empty
# (TCP_FLAGS_DISPOSITION="") then DROP is assumed.
#

TCP_FLAGS_DISPOSITION=DROP

#LAST LINE -- DO NOT REMOVE

tycho 26th March 2007 13:35

Hi, I'm glad you like my article, sorry for the late response.
if I'm not mistaken your eth1 is at 192.168.1.1
But the firewall drops a request to 192.168.2.1
Thats obviously a clou. What's the content of your /etc/network/interfaces?


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