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dayknight 21st May 2008 01:30

Traditional DNS easy question
 
Hi,

First of all, I found "Traditional DNS" Howto be excellent tutorial. I had been looking to learn DNS and found several sites to be going through a lot of technical stuff which for beginners could be quite challenging to understand. This tutorial http://www.howtoforge.com/traditional_dns_howto walks you through basic DNS and is very easy to implement. However, I still have few questions

1) The tutorial specifies db.root and db.local as well as bind folder which I didn't find in Centos5 however I solved by creating bind folder and by creating symbolic link db.root and db.local to named.root and named.local respectively using the following commands (for those who want to know).

mkdir /var/named/chroot/etc/bind
chown root:named /var/named/chroot/etc/bind
cd /var/named/chroot/etc/bind
ln -s ../../var/named/named.root db.root
ln -s ../../var/named/named.local named.local

(question 1) even though the DNS works fine, for clarity and security sake, did I set the right group for bind directory? and also is it ok to sym linking to files in named directory?)

2)I checked the DNS configuration using DNS online tools and found that the secondary nameserver doesn't have the PTR (reverse record and points to the local machine) which I couldnot set as the tutorial instructs to create a named file with type slave which I think is meant to be created on a seperate machine for redundant DNS hence I didn't make use of the security feature outlined on page 8 of the tutorial --- allow-transfer { 70.253.158.45; };.

(question 2) How would I set the second name server to have a reverse record so it passes the DNS check. Would there be any problems with current setup that I have?

Thank you for your help

falko 21st May 2008 15:07

Quote:

Originally Posted by dayknight
1) The tutorial specifies db.root and db.local as well as bind folder which I didn't find in Centos5

The tutorial is based on Debian, so paths might differ.

Quote:

Originally Posted by dayknight
however I solved by creating bind folder and by creating symbolic link db.root and db.local to named.root and named.local respectively using the following commands (for those who want to know).

mkdir /var/named/chroot/etc/bind
chown root:named /var/named/chroot/etc/bind
cd /var/named/chroot/etc/bind
ln -s ../../var/named/named.root db.root
ln -s ../../var/named/named.local named.local

(question 1) even though the DNS works fine, for clarity and security sake, did I set the right group for bind directory? and also is it ok to sym linking to files in named directory?)

That seems to be ok.

Quote:

Originally Posted by dayknight
2)I checked the DNS configuration using DNS online tools and found that the secondary nameserver doesn't have the PTR (reverse record and points to the local machine) which I couldnot set as the tutorial instructs to create a named file with type slave which I think is meant to be created on a seperate machine for redundant DNS hence I didn't make use of the security feature outlined on page 8 of the tutorial --- allow-transfer { 70.253.158.45; };.

(question 2) How would I set the second name server to have a reverse record so it passes the DNS check. Would there be any problems with current setup that I have?

Thank you for your help

If you don't use allow-transfer, then you can fill in the zone manually on the slave.

dayknight 21st May 2008 21:52

Thankyou Falko,

Is there any such thing as "traditional postfix" :) on how to forge ?

falko 22nd May 2008 13:21

No. There are a lots of Postfix tutorials here, but none that goes that deep into the basics...


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