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-   -   Capabilites of bind DNS (http://www.howtoforge.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1207)

networkguru00 10th November 2005 17:34

Capabilites of bind DNS
 
I would say that I'm a noob when it comes to working with networks and setting up web pages. But I've never setup a DNS server. What are the capabilities of this DNS server. I understand what DNS does, but can I actually set a domain name and it will be referenced to my ip address. Sorry for the imcompatence, and thanks for any help that can be given.

Nick

falko 10th November 2005 18:13

It allows you to run your own DNS servers. Let's say you are hosting web sites for your customers, and in order to be able to register domains you are a reseller of a domain registrar. Most of these domain registrars offer something like "Managed DNS" which costs a little bit and uses the registrar's name servers.

Now whenever you register a new domain, you must specify name servers that should be responsible for the domain, so you can either buy "Managed DNS", or you specify your own DNS servers which saves you the money for "Managed DNS" (if you have hundreds of domains this can sum up...) and makes you independent because it's you who controls your name servers (imagine your registrar has problems with his DNS servers, or something in the "Managed DNS" web interface doesn't work, or you're allowed to make only 50 DNS changes per day but you want to move a server and have to update 200 domains at once or...)

With ISPConfig you can create DNS records, and whenever you register a new domain you can then specify your ISPConfig servers as authoritative name servers.
If you have two ISPConfig servers you can create the primary DNS records ("Master Records" in ISPConfig talk) on the first server, and on the second server you create secondary DNS records ("Slave Records") so that DNS is still available if one of these two servers fails.

networkguru00 10th November 2005 19:02

Falko,

Thanks for the quick replay.

Ok, say that I would like to host my own websites and be able to change/add domains as I please. What would be the process that I would have to go through to be able to do this. Is there a company that I should deal with?

Nick

falko 10th November 2005 23:00

Ok, this is how I did it:
I register my domains with DirectI. They also offer "Managed DNS".

First, I registered a domain that I use for technical issues only, not for web sites or emails (hostmu.com). For that domain I bought "Managed DNS" and created the A records ns1 - ns6.hostmu.com.
Right now, I use ns5.hostmu.com as primary DNS server, ns6.hostmu.com as secondary DNS. Both run ISPConfig, and I create all records using ISPConfig.
Whenever I want to register a new domain, I create all needed DNS records (A records: www and mail, MX record: mail) before I register the domain. Then I go to DirectI and register the domain, and when I register it, the web interface allows me to put in up to four name servers, so I fill in ns5.hostmu.com and ns6.hostmu.com.
Voilą! That's it! :)

rosa hsiao 26th November 2005 10:14

Quote:

Originally Posted by falko
Ok, this is how I did it:
Right now, I use ns5.hostmu.com as primary DNS server, ns6.hostmu.com as secondary DNS. Both run ISPConfig, and I create all records using ISPConfig.
Whenever I want to register a new domain, I create all needed DNS records (A records: www and mail, MX record: mail) before I register the domain. Then I go to DirectI and register the domain, and when I register it, the web interface allows me to put in up to four name servers, so I fill in ns5.hostmu.com and ns6.hostmu.com.
Voilą! That's it! :)

If abc.test1.com.tw (203.79.221.xxx) is located behind a firewall with port 53 already mapped to 192.168.1.30.
What IP addresses are you using for ISPConfig's A records:www and mail,MX record:mail?external IP (203.79.xxx.xxx) or internal IP(192.168.1.30)?

I am using abc.test1.com.tw as name server and already register the domain at rs.apol.com.tw. but when I create all needed DNS records (IP: 192.168.1.30) and try to register another new domain (test2.idv.tw) using abc.test1.com.tw as names server . The name server doesn't seem to work. All nslookup A record of www.test2.com.tw is pointing to 192.168.1.30. I can open the website www.test1.com.tw but not www.test2.com.tw.

till 26th November 2005 10:49

You have to use the external IP for the DNS A Records, otherwise computers outside your local network cant find the server.

rosa hsiao 27th November 2005 04:19

Quote:

Originally Posted by till
You have to use the external IP for the DNS A Records, otherwise computers outside your local network cant find the server.

But I had seen from some posts in this forum that if using IP Sharer as a firewall and gateway (191.168.1.1) ,I should use internal IP for all the DNS A Records. Since I have configured the gateway to forward my external IP to internal IP and Port 53 is not blocked.

falko 27th November 2005 15:32

Quote:

Originally Posted by rosa hsiao
But I had seen from some posts in this forum that if using IP Sharer as a firewall and gateway (191.168.1.1) ,I should use internal IP for all the DNS A Records. Since I have configured the gateway to forward my external IP to internal IP and Port 53 is not blocked.

This will only work inside your local network. Say you have configured DNS for the domain example.com so that it points to 192.168.0.100 (internal IP address), then you can use the DNS server inside your local network, because example.com will be resolved to 192.168.0.100. If someone outside your local network uses the DNS server and wants to access example.com, that won't work because example.com will still be resolved to 192.168.0.100 which is not a public IP address and therefore cannot be accessed from the outside.

rosa hsiao 28th November 2005 15:15

Quote:

Originally Posted by falko
This will only work inside your local network. Say you have configured DNS for the domain example.com so that it points to 192.168.0.100 (internal IP address), then you can use the DNS server inside your local network, because example.com will be resolved to 192.168.0.100. If someone outside your local network uses the DNS server and wants to access example.com, that won't work because example.com will still be resolved to 192.168.0.100 which is not a public IP address and therefore cannot be accessed from the outside.

Do I also have to use external IP address in ISPConfig under:
Management==>Server==>settings
or just use internal IP address for it and all the newly created websites?

The default ISPConfig's Servername is Server 1. Do I have to replace it with real hostname as same as stated in /etc/hostname or just use Server 1 as a reference only?

falko 28th November 2005 17:58

Quote:

Originally Posted by rosa hsiao
Do I also have to use external IP address in ISPConfig under:
Management==>Server==>settings
or just use internal IP address for it and all the newly created websites?

No, here you must use the internal IP addresses (the ones you see when you run
Code:

ifconfig
on the shell).

Quote:

Originally Posted by rosa hsiao
The default ISPConfig's Servername is Server 1. Do I have to replace it with real hostname as same as stated in /etc/hostname or just use Server 1 as a reference only?

No, Server 1 is ok. It has nothing to do with the real hostname.


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